Diana Nguyen

Since we last profiled Diana Khoi Nguyen, the accolades have only compiled. Nguyen, teaching assistant professor of management at Daniels, is also an award-winning poet.

As you can read more about in Tamara Chapman’s article we first published in December, Nguyen’s debut collection of poems in “Ghost Of” was a finalist for the 2018 National Book Award poetry category, capturing one of the highest honors any book, much less a first book, can receive.

In February, Nguyen received the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, also for “Ghost Of.”

“Ghost Of” by Diana Khoi Nguyen

The release states that, “Nguyen was chosen for her poignant meditations on the death of her brother in “Ghost Of,” a collection that captures the power that such a painful absence has exerted—and continues to exert—on her family’s life.”

Past Kate Tufts Discovery Award winners include Yona Harvey, Phillip B. Williams and Brandon Som.

Then, in May, she received the 2019 Colorado Book Award in the poetry category. Not quite as prestigious, but still very cool, Nguyen was chosen by Westword as one of the “Ten Must-Read Colorado Authors.”

Unfortunately, Nguyen won’t be in Colorado for long. She received her PhD in English and Literary Arts from DU in June and accepted a position at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, where she’ll be the 2019-20 writer-in-residence. She’ll be teaching poetry craft classes for students at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral level.

Nguyen received her PhD in English and Literary Arts.

She leaves big shoes to fill at Daniels as the lead instructor for the core-level strategic business communication courses.

“I had first entered Daniels on a whim, answering a teaching assistant ad, not realizing that over two years later, I would be leaving having been the course lead instructor,” Nguyen said. “I could neither have imagined such a nurturing academic environment for myself as a young academic and educator, nor envisioned the inspiring leadership of Lisa Victoravich, Craig Wallace and Brent Chrite—as well as the welcoming collegiality and professionalism of my management department, and other business communication instructors—Lowell Valencia-Miller in particular.”

The Daniels community wishes her well and looks forward to reading her future books of poetry.

“What I had not expected, but now realize in retrospection as I move on, is that I received a valuable education at Daniels in addition to my doctoral studies over in English and literary arts,” she said. “This has been a formative phase of my life; one I will never forget; one I wish for all others after me.”