Speakers & Sessions

Opening Keynote: Inspire Integrity

Corey CiocchettiPresenter: Professor Corey Ciocchetti

 

Summary: Corey’s most popular talk encourages audiences to chase the truly important things in life such as a solid character, strong personal relationships and a sense of contentment. These “real rabbits” are compared and contrasted to worldly success such as excessive wealth, popularity and prestige. Audience members leave with a better sense of what it takes to develop character, set priorities, gain a big-picture perspective and chase an authentic life


To Thine Own Selfie, Be True: Defining Success Within Your Own Values

Presenter: John Mallory

Summary: What do an RV, a selfie stick, the United States Navy, and Psychology have in common? They’re all ingredients for one person’s journey towards a balanced and fulfilling life. How we measure success can be a powerful way of defining our own sense of self-worth. However, when our values come in conflict with our personal or professional goals, we can become dissatisfied, frustrated, and ultimately fall short of our own potential. This interactive discussion will analyze some of the influences on our behavior, some of the psychological theories about how that can impact us, and strategize about how to move forward with those values.

mallory-johnJohn Mallory, Clinical Psychology Doctoral Student, John.Mallory@du.edu

 

 

 

 


Your Reputation—Creating Trust & Integrity in Business & Life

Presenter: Robert Grey

grey-robertSummary: Rob Grey is entertaining speaker and teacher who draws from 30 years of experience as a personal growth instructor, investment fiduciary, and financial planner to provide a framework for building reputations. What people think about you can create or destroy opportunities. Your reputation is built on being noticed for the right things in the right way by the right people. Reputation is about credibility, trust, and influence. Good reputations are earned slowly and lost quickly. The intersection of business and ethics can be found in understanding best practices in a “Fiduciary Relationship” as guide to being the best you can be.

rob@denvermoneymanager.comwww.denvermoneymanager.com, T

witter:  @stayrich


The ‘Right’ Call is Going to Hurt—Maybe I Can Figure Another Way Around It!

Presenter: Scott Southworth

Summary: Making the right call when it doesn’t cost us that much is pretty easy. Making the right call when it costs a lot, (or perhaps everything), can be tougher. We’ll walk through some situations that actually occurred and see how we’d handle them. We’ll start looking at all the angles and discover at what point do the wheels come off for us. At the end of the night, you may be surprised how little it can take to have many of us consider compromising ourselves. And then you’ll be better prepared to stand fast and weather the storms when they hit. 

Come ready to put your ethical foundation to the test – it’ll be fun and we’ll figure out together what it takes to do it right! 

southworth-scottScott D. Southworth
Assistant Vice President – Daniels Fund
scott.d.southworth@gmail.com

 

 

 


The Ethics Tango

Presenters: Sonja B. Holt and Paula Holt

Summary: 

Paula HoltPaula Holt

In a story about being in the right place at the right time, Professor Paula A. Holt joined the Daniels faculty in 2010 as a Lecturer of Business Ethics and Legal Studies and has enjoyed each moment of teaching ever since. Paula continues to maintain a private litigation practice in the Denver Metro Area, to ensure she can provide practical examples to her students.

On day two of the EBC, Prof. Holt discusses actually living the ethical life and engages students in a service-learning component to the EBC. It is important that academics provide students with opportunities to apply their education in hands-on experiences. The goal is to have students realize and understand the value of sharing ethical learning with others and why community development is an essential part of being ethical.

holt-sonjaDr. Sonja B. Holt

As a full time practicing Clinical Psychologist in Arvada, CO for over 30 years, Sonja Holt, PhD utilizes Descriptive Psychology in the assessment and therapy of children, families and adults.  Sonja received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Colorado where she completed her doctoral dissertation on Appraisal and Competence in Moral Judgment and Behavior.  She has continued to develop the topic of applications of moral development, which has been invaluable to her work as a psychologist, a parent and educator. In recent years, Dr. Holt has worked at the DU Graduate School of Psychology as adjunct faculty advising and teaching the graduate psychology students.

The Holt mother/daughter duo have combined their interests to assist DU students preparing for careers in business with ways to encounter and respond (“dance”) to the ethical aspects of their profession.  In the Ethics Tango, Dr. and Prof. Holt discuss how this Latin dance is a partnership of many styles, as is the application of ethical frameworks in real life dilemmas. The combination of psychology and the Tango will help students understand the value of ethical decision-making, and they will learn ways to lead or follow when faced with moral dilemmas in business.


Ethics of the Job Search and Offer Negotiation: Why Should You Care?

Presenters: Kelli Turner and Tyler Till

Summary: The Daniels Career Services staff is not just here to review résumés (although we do that too). We’re here to teach you lifelong skills and help you become ready for the professional world. A strong GPA and some luck is not likely to land you your dream career.

Would you like to have a full time job with benefits someday? Would you like to make more than the average person with a college degree?

If so, offer and salary negotiation are topics you’ll need to know and utilize for the rest of your life. In this session, you’ll get to see real-time examples of negotiations between a candidate and an employer, and learn the skills you need to maximize your income potential.


Facing a Crisis? Listen Up!

Presenter: John Holcomb

holcomb-johnSummary: Whether a personal crisis or a corporate crisis, it happens everyday. How you handle it, or how a company handles it, is a true measure of integrity. Lots of corporations and executives mishandle crises, and they pay for it. Some corporations and executives handle them well and reap rewards. The same is true of athletes, celebrities, and politicians. This session will examine the ethics underlying effective crisis management and the ethical blind spots of those who seem to blunder along from one mistake to another. Examples are all around us of individuals whose lives and careers crumble around them, and of corporations that crater into mediocrity or oblivion. We will name the names and examine why. We will also examine how they might have saved their skins or their souls!

Email: John.Holcomb@du.edu

http://daniels.du.edu/directory/john-holcomb/


Accounting: Keeping Capitalism Honest

Presenter: Philipp Schaberl

Summary: Imagine going to the corner store to buy a carton of milk, only to find that the refrigerator is locked. When you’ve persuaded the shopkeeper to retrieve the milk, you then end up arguing over whether you’re going to hand the money over first, or whether he is going to hand over the milk. Finally you manage to arrange an elaborate simultaneous exchange. A little taste of life in a world without trust–now imagine trying to arrange a mortgage or an IPO. Doing business is what creates wealth. Trust is what enables people to do business with each other. But where does this trust come from? Who are the stewards of trust in capital markets? 

The primary role of accounting is to keep capital markets honest through accountability. My lecture will start with a brief discussion of the key issues that generate a need for reliable accounting information in capital markets and how such information facilitates trust, economic exchange and wealth creation. Next, you will learn more about why integrity, ethical conduct and a strong character are an accountant’s most valuable assets. To conclude, we will talk about DU’s prestigious Accounting Core and how it could help you develop the habits and character for a purposeful career and authentic life.

schaberl-philippPhilipp.schaberl@du.edu
http://daniels.du.edu/directory/philipp-schaberl/

 

 

 

 


Code or Compass: Do Complex Rules and Regulations Actually Undermine a Culture of Ethics?

Presenter: Albert Z. Kovacs

kovacs-albertSummary: In the classroom, ethics and “right” behavior is often discussed in broad concepts and overarching principles. But in the boardroom, ethical ideals can be overwhelmed by a confusing myriad of  rules, regulations, policies and procedures. Why the difference? Which approach fosters ethical instincts? Which approach yields more ethical behavior? Can even the most well-intentioned rules and policies promote a culture of evasion rather than a culture of positive ethical thinking? In this discussion, we will explore these questions in several contexts, ranging from university codes of conduct to the legal principles of corporate governance. A new maxim for practical ethical behavior will be proposed—is it one that you or your business could embrace? 

Albert Z. Kovacs is a corporate lawyer who is dedicated to helping people navigate complex business and corporate governance issues, as well as the distinctive aspects of Nevada’s corporate and business laws.  He also strives to craft and promote legislation in Nevada to make business statutes clearer and more accessible.  Albert moved to Las Vegas after beginning his career in at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP in New York. At Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana, he studied philosophy and physics and hosted a weekly radio show. He received his law degree from Duke University School of Law.


Avoiding Prison: How Ethics Can Help You Avoid Criminal Liability, Even if You Forget the Law

Presenter: Bruce Klaw

Summary: Bruce KlawProfessor Bruce Klaw is an assistant professor in the Department of Business Ethics and Legal Studies at the Daniels College of Business. He received his B.A. in Philosophy, Politics  & Law from S.U.N.Y. Binghamton and his J.D. from Harvard Law School. He practiced law for nearly six years, focusing on white-collar criminal enforcement, international dispute resolution and complex civil litigation matters. He also served for three years as an assistant professor in South Korea, teaching courses on American and international criminal law, white collar crime, crime prevention and criminal justice theory & policy. 

Whether it’s about insider trading, securities fraud, bribery or another crime, each new day seems to bring fresh news reports of business leaders and corporations under investigation or indictment. So, as you enter the business world, how can you avoid becoming another cautionary tale in today’s legal minefield? Professor Klaw’s session will help unlock the keys to avoiding criminal liability by distilling these laws to their essential core and teaching you how to apply the ethical frameworks you’ll learn at DU to your lives and future careers.


What Can We Learn From Professional Sports? Ethics from the Playing Field to the Boardroom

Presenters: Paul Seaborn & Dennis Wittmer

Summary: In today¹s sports world the action that takes place off the field seems to generate just as much attention as the games themselves. Doping scandals, “Deflategate”, challenges to the distinction between amateurs and professionals and inappropriate behavior by pro athletes are just some of the recent incidents that have raised ethical concerns, not only for those directly involved but for the fans and corporate sponsors that make professional sports so popular. 

While these situations may seem far removed from the business world in fact they represent high-profile examples of situations that managers, board members, employees and other stakeholders face every day. The field of management focuses on the coordination between these groups as they seek to accomplish their goals and objectives efficiently. In our session we will discuss and debate recent incidents from the world of sports and then connect them to similar situations that occur in business and that you may experience in your own careers.

seaborn-paulPaul Seaborn, Assistant Professor of Management, Daniels College of Business
paul.seaborn@du.edu Website: www.paulseaborn.com Twitter: @pseaborn

Paul Seaborn is an Assistant Professor in the Management Department at the University of Denver, where he teaches courses on Business and Society, Management Consulting and Strategic Management. His two primary research interests are corporate political activity (lobbying, campaign contributions) and information disclosure (ratings, rankings and certifications). Prior to becoming an academic Paul worked in strategy and IT consulting with IBM and Mercer Management Consulting. He is a proud Canadian and avid fan of sports ranging from college basketball and football to curling and bobsleigh.

wittmer-dennisDennis Wittmer, Professor of Management, Daniels College of Business
dwittmer@du.edu

Dennis Wittmer is chair of the Daniels College of Business department of management and professor of management. After receiving his doctorate in public administration from Syracuse University in 1992, he joined the Daniels College faculty as assistant professor. He was named associate professor in 1998 and named professor and department chair in 2007.

 


Living Integrity with Build A Bear

Presenter: Paula Holt

Paula HoltSummary:  In a story about being in the right place at the right time, Professor Paula A. Holt joined the Daniels faculty in 2010 as a Lecturer of Business Ethics and Legal Studies and has enjoyed each moment of teaching ever since. Paula continues to maintain a private litigation practice in the Denver Metro Area, to ensure she can provide practical examples to her students.

On day two of the EBC, Prof. Holt discusses actually living the ethical life and engages students in a service-learning component to the EBC. It is important that academics provide students with opportunities to apply their education in hands-on experiences. The goal is to have students realize and understand the value of sharing ethical learning with others and why community development is an essential part of being ethical.