Graduate Business Certificates: Finance

Succeeding in today’s business environment demands an in-depth and actionable understanding of financial complexities. Daniels College of Business offers three Graduate Business Certificates that supply you with the critical financial and technical tools needed to evaluate financial data and make financially sound decisions.

Each certificate program consists of four required graduate-level courses (16 credit hours). You’ll take the same graduate-level concentration courses as MBA or master’s degree students at Daniels, but in a time frame that works best for you.

Course Descriptions»

Certificate programs offered:

Foundations of Finance

Empowers employees at any level to understand, interpret and make strategic decisions based on the financial constitution of a business. You’ll learn how to identify a company’s strengths and weaknesses as revealed by financial statements as well as how to capitalize on that information.

Courses:

ACTG 4610 Financial Accounting and Reporting | 4 Credit Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide you with an understanding of financial statements issued by companies to external parties, such as shareholders, creditors, and government agencies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). To achieve this purpose, the course will: 1) introduce students to the most important issues relating to the assets, liabilities and stockholders' equity accounts reported on the balance and income statement reporting issues; 2) provide students with sufficient understanding of the reporting mechanics to locate and interpret relevant information in the financial statements; 3) assist students in developing skills that can be used in analyzing financial information provided by companies; and 4) examine major transaction categories and accounting policies of business firms and their financial statement implications. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to appreciate both the usefulness and the limitations of accounting information. The perspective of the course is at all times that of the user, rather than a preparer, of financial statements.

ACTG 4610 Financial Accounting and Reporting | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4630 Managerial Finance | 4 Credit Hours

This course discusses basic principles of finance and provides practical tools for financial decisions and valuation. The purpose of this course is to give students a thorough introduction to the basics of finance. You will learn how to value distant and uncertain cash flows. You will learn how to apply the tools to make investment decisions for a firm. You will also survey the fundamental drivers of financing policy in a corporation and learn how financial markets interact with businesses. This course is divided into four sections. The first covers the use of financial statements to glean information about the firm, its performance and financial needs. Section II deals with the basic building blocks of financial valuation: time value of money analysis, bond and stock valuation. During the remainder of the course, we turn our attention to applying the tools of valuation to the main types of corporate financial decisions. Section III analyzes firms’ capital budgeting decisions and Section IV considers a company’s investment in working capital. Offered FA, WI, SP and Sum.

FIN 4630 Managerial Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4200 Financial Institutions and Markets | 4 Credit Hours

Financial institutions and markets is a survey of money, capital and derivation markets. It is intended to provide an understanding of the securities traded in those markets and how they are priced. Real-world examples will be given to make connections with the theoretical framework. Equal amounts of quantitative techniques and descriptive information will be used. Those students who are interested in obtaining a securities license such as the NASD Series 7 for a General Securities Representative or accreditation as a Chartered Financial Analyst (C.F.A.) will find this course a good first step towards achieving these career goals. Throughout the class, we will relate financial decision making to ethical issues, such as financial reporting and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, incorporating items related to society and the environment in the capital budgeting process, information for securities valuation, and sustainability. We will also devote one class session to sustainable development. Offered FA, WI, SP.

FIN 4200 Financial Institutions and Markets | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4410 Financial Planning and Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

This course builds on the material learned in FIN 4630. It examines the determinants of return on equity and the capital structure decision, with an emphasis on how these affect shareholder value and the value of the firm. Corporate financial planning and sustainable growth will be addressed. Business valuation will be calculated using proforma financial statements to estimate free cash flows in the discounted cash flow approach. Other approaches to business valuation will also be examined. The course will also cover EPS drivers and cash flow statement analysis. PREREQ: FIN 4630 or equivalent. Offered FA, WI, SP, and Sum.

FIN 4410 Financial Planning and Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

Corporate Finance

Provides the critical financial and technical knowledge to help you dissect, analyze and interpret corporate financial data to make sound business decisions.

Courses:

FIN 4410 Financial Planning and Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

This course builds on the material learned in FIN 4630. It examines the determinants of return on equity and the capital structure decision, with an emphasis on how these affect shareholder value and the value of the firm. Corporate financial planning and sustainable growth will be addressed. Business valuation will be calculated using proforma financial statements to estimate free cash flows in the discounted cash flow approach. Other approaches to business valuation will also be examined. The course will also cover EPS drivers and cash flow statement analysis. PREREQ: FIN 4630 or equivalent. Offered FA, WI, SP, and Sum.

FIN 4410 Financial Planning and Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4420 Capital Expenditures Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

This course will show you how managers of large corporations create value for their owners. The major focus of the course will be on capital investment decisions are made, but several ways to create value, such as the decision to lease or buy an asset and merger decisions will also be examined. A manager’s ability to create shareholder value through asset acquisitions depends upon having defined appropriate criteria for making accept / reject decisions. These criteria must, therefore, be firmly grounded in financial theory. Thus, much of the course will be devoted to an examination of those aspects of the theory of finance relevant to creating value from making asset investment decisions. Offered FA, WI, SP.

FIN 4420 Capital Expenditures Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4870 Strategic Finance | 4 Credit Hours

This is an advanced corporate finance course that considers the linkages that exist between business strategy and financial strategy. The overarching theme of this course is that in order for a business to remain viable, the corporation must win in two arenas—the commercial market as well as the capital market. The goal of this course is to enhance your competence in two areas: 1) financial /analytical skills and 2) your ability to critically evaluate whether the corporate strategy is supported by its financial structure and strategy. The first part of the course considers business strategy. The intent here is not to make you strategists, but to provide sufficient content to enable you to ask the right questions when assessing whether the firm’s strategy makes sense and fits the financial and operating structures. The next part of the course focuses on the practical assessment and implementation of finance theory/strategy. More specifically, the course focuses on how a firm implements its leverage/dividend/investment decisions and the impact of these decisions on shareholder value. In the third part of the class, we will consider the topic of mergers and acquisitions. This will include a comprehensive discussion of the topic including: accounting, tax, legal, due diligence, valuation, and financing/deal structure. The last part of the course focuses on financial re-engineering and restructuring. In this module the course will focus on how value can be enhanced or destroyed via business and financial restructuring (including restructuring under distress). Offered FA, SP.

FIN 4870 Strategic Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4885 External Finance | 4 Credit Hours

This is an advanced Corporate Finance course, focusing on the decisions by companies related to external sources of financing. There will be a mix of theory and practice, with many outside speakers providing insight into the practice component. External financing will be examined in the context of several different situations and contexts, including the different sources used as the company moves through its life cycle. Throughout the class, we will relate financial decision making to the ethical and regulatory issues embodied in the Dodd-Frank Act. Learning outcomes include: understanding and describing the current economic and financial environment; understanding the role of the economic and financial environment on the debt/ equity decision; understanding the sources of startup capital and angel investing; understanding the bank loan application and evaluation process; understanding the role and timing of venture capital and private equity in external financing; understanding the decision and process involved in going private; understanding the merger and acquisition process as a way to finance growth; and understanding the external financing alternatives and process in situations of financial distress or bankruptcy. PRERQ: FIN 4410. Offered WI and Sum.

FIN 4885 External Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

Investment Management

Expands your knowledge of investment management focusing on arbitrage relationships, pricing and valuing securities, measuring portfolio performance and long-term and tactical asset allocation.

Courses:

FIN 4200 Financial Institutions and Markets | 4 Credit Hours

Financial institutions and markets is a survey of money, capital and derivation markets. It is intended to provide an understanding of the securities traded in those markets and how they are priced. Real-world examples will be given to make connections with the theoretical framework. Equal amounts of quantitative techniques and descriptive information will be used. Those students who are interested in obtaining a securities license such as the NASD Series 7 for a General Securities Representative or accreditation as a Chartered Financial Analyst (C.F.A.) will find this course a good first step towards achieving these career goals. Throughout the class, we will relate financial decision making to ethical issues, such as financial reporting and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, incorporating items related to society and the environment in the capital budgeting process, information for securities valuation, and sustainability. We will also devote one class session to sustainable development. Offered FA, WI, SP.

FIN 4200 Financial Institutions and Markets | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4320 Security Analysis and Valuation | 4 Credit Hours

This course focuses on (i) analytical models of investment valuation—the discounted cash flow models, relative valuation models, and contingent claim pricing models; (ii) collecting, analyzing, and interpreting financial information; (iii) producing industry-standard financial analyst research reports on stocks; and (iv) developing investment strategies based on research papers and the latest innovations in finance.

FIN 4320 Security Analysis and Valuation | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4330 Portfolio Management | 4 Credit Hours

This course covers four major areas with a strong emphasis on financial modeling and quantitative techniques as they apply the tenets of portfolio theory to “real life” portfolio management: Modern Portfolio Theory; Portfolio Construction Methods; Risk Measurement and Analysis; Portfolio Performance Measurement and Return Attribution. Offered WI, SP.

FIN 4330 Portfolio Management | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4890 Fixed Income Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

This course provides an in-depth understanding of the basic concepts related to option-free bonds and bonds with imbedded options. Focus will be on a limited number of topics ranging from bond valuation to price volatility. The course is designed so upon completion the student should have an understanding of bond characteristics such as duration and convexity. An understanding of how these items relate in a portfolio context as well. In addition, an awareness of how binomial trees are used to price a broad spectrum of bonds is provided. The student is also expected to have an understanding of how hedging the risk of bond portfolio is accomplished.

FIN 4890 Fixed Income Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

Additional finance courses available to customize a certificate.

These may be combined with the courses above.

FIN 4500 Financial Modeling | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4610 Multinational Finance | 4 Credit Hours

Multinational Finance explores financial management in the international arena. Topics include derivative securities, currency risk, international capital budgeting, and international portfolio management. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to accomplish the following objectives: explain the determinants of foreign exchange rates and how exchange rate risk can be hedged; understand derivatives on currencies; explain and identify the financial difficulties and opportunities faced by corporations when operating internationally; apply advanced techniques for making international corporate investment decisions; identify the determinants of the expected returns on international investments; discuss current issues in international finance. PREREQ: FIN 3900 or FIN 4630. Offered FA, WI, SP and Sum.

FIN 4610 Multinational Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4740 Managerial Microeconomics | 2 Credit Hours

This course meshes the standard tools of microeconomic analysis with a well-rounded appreciation of the important perspectives that form the business environment in the contemporary world. The goal is to provide students with the tools from microeconomics, game theory, and industrial organization that they need to make sound managerial decisions. The course will use case studies to develop practical insights into managing the firm’s resources to achieve competitive advantage. Offered FA, WI, SP and Sum.

FIN 4740 Managerial Microeconomics | 2 Credit Hours»

FIN 4750 Managerial Macroeconomics | 2 Credit Hours

This course covers the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics. It teaches students how private market forces and government policy decisions drive fluctuations in the global economy and affect the business environment. It explores issues related to inflation, interest rates, foreign exchange rate, business cycles, and monetary and fiscal policies. The course will use case studies to analyze real-life macroeconomic issues, and students are encouraged to investigate the potential and limitations of macroeconomic theory with real-world problems. Offered FA, WI, SP and Sum.

FIN 4750 Managerial Macroeconomics | 2 Credit Hours»

FIN 4800 Organized Walk Down Wall Street | 4 Credit Hours

The first part of this course consists of readings to provide a foundation and background in the areas of investments, exchanges, investment banking, and commercial banking. This will be followed by 5 days in New York visiting a mixture of organizations including the New York Stock Exchange, brokerage firms, asset management firms, investment banks, commercial banks, and financial research firms. PREREQ: FIN 4630 or equivalent for FIN 4800 ; FIN 2800 and Junior standing for FIN 3800. Interterm course offered in August and December.

FIN 4800 Organized Walk Down Wall Street | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4830 Econometrics for Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4860 Risk Management | 4 Credit Hours

This class will focus on concepts and methods used to identify, isolate, and control the risks associated with financial securities or corporate financing decisions. Hedging in both the corporate arena and security markets will be addressed. Items such as swaps and derivative securities will be discussed as an integral part of risk management. Students will develop a process for addressing real world issues related to risk management, and leave the class with an understanding of derivative securities, and how one can use these securities to aid in risk management. Offered FA, SP.

FIN 4860 Risk Management | 4 Credit Hours»