Graduate Business Certificates: Stay Current, Expand Your Skills, Move Ahead

The Graduate Business Certificate (GBC) program at the Daniels College of Business enables individuals to take existing graduate level courses outside of a Daniels master’s program. Whether you’re looking to take on a new role in your current field, transition to another business discipline or simply enhance your existing skills, a GBC from Daniels can help you move up the career ladder.

The reasons for pursuing a Graduate Business Certificate are as varied as the number of courses we offer. For some, it is a first step toward pursuing a Daniels MBA or specialized master’s degree as the classes can be applied toward those programs. For others, including Daniels alumni, it’s a way to refresh their education or pursue a specific business discipline in more depth. But, for all, it is a valuable investment in their future.

Benefits

Accountancy

In recent years, corporate America has been rocked by accounting scandals requiring today’s accountants to follow new and more complex regulatory and ethical rules. The Daniels School of Accountancy offers graduate-level certificate programs to keep abreast of these changes and to update your skills.

Each certificate programs consists of 16 credit hours. You’ll take the same graduate level concentration courses as MBA or master’s degree students at Daniels, but in a time frame that works best for you.

Course Descriptions» 

Suggested Certificates—Or You May Customize Your Own

Professional Accreditation

Need additional academic hours to qualify to sit for the Uniform CPA exam in Colorado? Looking for a way to add additional hours using education in lieu of work experience to qualify for a CPA license in Colorado? Or perhaps, you’re just searching for a way to complete academic courses to prepare for the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) exam. Whatever the reason, this program allows you to customize your education to your accreditation requirements while earning a Daniels Graduate Business Certificate.

Accounting for Business

Learn the basics of financial statement preparation and how to use tools such as breakeven, budgets and balanced scorecard for management accounting analysis. The curriculum provides a user’s perspective on interpreting and understanding financial statements, real-company case studies to teach accounting and financial analytical capabilities as well as cost accounting techniques.

Courses: 

ACTG 4610 Financial Accounting | 4 Credit Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the financial statements issued by companies to external parties, such as shareholders and creditors. The course covers the fundamentals of accounting, from recording economic events in the accounting records to the preparation of the company’s financial statements. In addition, the course examines major transaction categories, accounting policy choices of business firms and their financial statement implications, as well as the content of publicly-traded companies’ Form 10-K annual reports. (Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer)

ACTG 4610 Financial Accounting | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4660 Strategic Cost Management | 4 Credit Hours

Strategic cost management methods and practices focus on how to help the firm succeed in contemporary business. Topics in the course include balanced scorecard, cost-volume-profit analysis, target costing, standard costing, and management control. The course will enable students to apply strategic thinking to management planning, decision-making, and management reporting. PREREQ: ACTG 4610. (Winter, Spring, Summer)

ACTG 4660 Strategic Cost Management | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4222 Understanding Financial Statements | 4 Credit Hours

At the conclusion of this course the student should understand: (1) management decisions that impact published financial statements, (2) the fundamentals of interpretation and analysis of financial statements, (3) economic and ethical issues relating to financial reporting, and (4) management attempts to enhance reported operating results. The course addresses the needs of managers and analysts, hence does not cover promulgated financial reporting rules in depth. The financial reporting topics expand on material presented in introductory Accounting and Finance courses. The focus is on the substance of the reported information. This course is not an approved elective for the MACC degree. (Autumn, Winter, Spring)

ACTG 4222 Understanding Financial Statements | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4340 Topics and Cases in Managerial Accounting | 4 Credit Hours

This course focuses upon innovative forensic, management control, productivity and business valuation approaches used by forensic and managerial accountants. Such strategies and techniques are evaluated through classroom discussion of cases and related articles. PREREQ: ACTG 4660. (Winter, Spring, Summer).

ACTG 4340 Topics and Cases in Managerial Accounting | 4 Credit Hours»

Audit and Accounting Systems

Gain an understanding of the basic tools and techniques of a forensic accountant, system developer and auditor. Learn to develop financial applications using Microsoft Access and create accurate reports of a business’s books. Whether you’re new to accounting or need to update your existing auditing skills, we will give you the know-how you need.

Courses:

ACTG 4155 Accounting Information Technology Systems in the Business Environment | 4 Credit Hours

The course will give students a basic understanding of how to develop a beginning-to-intermediate AIS system. Process flowcharts and entity-relationship diagrams will be used to document the system in Microsoft Visio. The course will explore the database structure used in various accounting IT systems. Students will be Microsoft Access certified by the end of the course. The course will also cover the IT topics contained in the BEC portion of the CPA exam. PREREQ: Instructor Permission. (Autumn, Winter, Spring).

ACTG 4155 Accounting Information Technology Systems and the Business Environment | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4176 Accounting Data Analytics | 4 Credit Hours

In this course, students explore overarching trends in big data and the impact to accounting and auditing fields while also gaining hands on experience working with business data sets. In today’s information world, accountants must be well equipped to understand and utilize the vast and varying data systems that feed a company’s decision making process. This course allows students to develop big data skills by learning the SQL language to query data from mock clients. Students execute Computer Assisted Auditing Techniques (CAATs) using both the SQL language as well was the audit data mining tool, IDEA. Students simulate the process to request client data files, load complex data sets, design and execute query procedures and summarize results for management. PREREQ: ACTG 4575 or Instructor Permission. (Spring).

ACTG 4176 Accounting Data Analytics | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4551 Auditing | 4 Credit Hours

This course is designed to provide you with a thorough understanding of auditing and related attest services. This includes gaining requisite knowledge about AICPA (U.S. GAAS) and PCAOB auditing standards and how they are applied in conducting a financial statement audit. Application of these standards applies to planning an audit, the risk assessment process including gaining an understanding of internal control, gathering and evaluating evidence, sampling, and issuing an audit report. PREREQ or COREQ: ACTG 4282. (Winter, Summer)

ACTG 4551 Auditing | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4520 Forensic Accounting and Auditing | 4 Credit Hours

Students will have an opportunity to learn, study, and discuss practical aspects of accounting as it is used to detect and prosecute fraud. Students will be exposed to improprieties, common fraud schemes, illegalities, and harassments. PREREQ or COREQ: ACTG 3551 or ACTG 4551 or Instructor Permission. (Summer)

ACTG 4520 Forensic Accounting and Auditing | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4552 Advanced Auditing | 4 Credit Hours

This course is designed to build on the foundation of auditing knowledge developed in ACTG 4551 and apply that knowledge to specific accounts and assertions in a financial statement audit. Students also examine selected SEC enforcement actions and discuss what audit procedures may have been beneficial to prevent the misstatement. PREREQ: ACTG 4551 or ACTG 3551. (Autumn, Spring)

ACTG 4552 Advanced Auditing | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4575 AIS Risk, Control and Audit | 4 Credit Hours

The purpose of this course is to engage students in topics covering the risk, audit and control of Accounting Information Systems. It is no longer possible to “audit around” an IT system. Today’s accounting professionals must possess a strong understanding of accounting information system risks and controls. This course will cover both 1) auditing of the IT controls that support an accounting information system and 2) using auditing and data mining tools to assist in financial statement audit techniques. Prerequisite: ACTG 4610. (Autumn, Winter, Spring)

ACTG 4575 AIS Risk, Control and Audit | 4 Credit Hours»

Financial Reporting and Taxation

Update and expand your knowledge in the areas of financial reporting and taxation by understanding and reviewing the latest financial reporting requirements; learning the latest information regarding changes in tax laws affecting individual, corporate and partnership tax returns and applying tax regulations to real-world situations.

Courses (choose 4):

ACTG 4462 Corporate and Partnership Tax

The course is designed for graduate accounting, finance or other business students in their study of advanced topics in federal income taxation. This is the second course in taxation, which makes use of some tax research techniques while concentrating on taxation of business enterprises: corporations and partnerships. PREREQ: An introductory tax course similar to ACTG 4400 or ACTG 4410. (Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer).

ACTG 4462 Corporation and Partnership Tax | 4 Credit Hours

The course is designed for graduate accounting, finance or other business students in their study of advanced topics in federal income taxation. This is the second course in taxation which concentrates on taxation of corporations, limited liability corporations, S corporations and partnerships. PREREQ: ACTG 4400 or ACTG 4410. (Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer)

ACTG 4462 Corporation and Partnership Tax | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4281 Intermediate Accounting | 4 Credit Hours

The focus of this course is the foundation and content of published financial statements. Specifically it covers the following broad topics: (1) Conceptual Framework of Financial Reporting; (2) Financial Statements and Related Disclosures; (3) Assets: Recognition and Measurement; and (4) Liabilities: Recognition and Measurement. Common to each of the topics is an emphasis on reading GAAP and applying GAAP guidance to fact patterns. At the conclusion of the course, students should be aware of the proper accounting treatment for many common situations; moreover, students should be fully comfortable interpreting GAAP literature to address scenarios involving assets, liabilities, and income that were not specifically covered in the class. PREREQ: ACTG 4610. (Autumn, Winter).

ACTG 4281 Intermediate Accounting | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4282 Intermediate Accounting II | 4 Credit Hours

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Financial Accounting. The focus of this course is the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles to complex business transactions. In this final course of the sequence, we finish our examination of the balance sheet by exploring the issues involved with stockholders’ equity, followed by in-depth study of some of the most complex accounting issues, including revenue recognition, accounting for income taxes, pensions and postemployment benefits, leases, and accounting changes and errors. PREREQ: ACTG 4281. (Winter, Spring).

ACTG 4282 Intermediate Accounting II | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4400 Taxation for Business & Investment Planning | 4 Credit Hours

This is an introductory tax course that emphasizes a conceptual approach to learning the income tax framework applicable to common business and investment transactions. It is designed to sensitize students to the tax implications of business decisions and to cultivate the student’s ability to ask good tax questions. This course will illustrate that effective business planning depends on an accurate assessment of relevant tax factors. PREREQ: ACTG 4610. Not open to students who have completed ACTG 4410. (Autumn)

ACTG 4400 Taxation for Business & Investment Planning | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4410 Federal Income Taxation | 4 Credit Hours

The course is designed for graduate accounting students that wish to study federal income taxation. This is the first course in taxation, which introduces the federal taxation system, the importance of tax authorities, the concepts of gross income and tax deductions and the tax implications of common property transactions. The course generally focuses on property transactions, but the taxation of individuals is emphasized with an objective of students being able to properly prepare complex individual tax returns. PREREQ: 4610. Not open to students who have completed ACTG 4400. (Winter, Spring)

ACTG 4410 Federal Income Taxation | 4 Credit Hours»

Additional accounting courses available to customize a certificate.

These may be combined with courses listed above.

ACTG 4220 Financial Accounting Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

The major course objective is to increase Finance Majors’ understanding of financial accounting for improved financial statement analysis and decision making. The course focus will be on current financial accounting issues and the interpretation of financial accounting information from a user perspective. This course is not an approved elective for the MACC degree. PREREQ: ACTG 4610 and FIN 4630. (Winter).

ACTG 4220 Financial Accounting Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4240 Topics & Cases in Financial Accounting | 4 Credit Hours

This course develops a greater awareness of contemporary accounting issues, focusing on financial reporting. The course is designed to enhance each student’s ability to identify, discuss, and resolve open-ended problems (i.e., those having no single “correct” answer) faced by accounting professionals. Each student must commit to being an active participant in the class discussions. Through the use of numerous cases involving all aspects of financial reporting, students identify issues, conduct authoritative research, then present and defend their conclusions using both oral and written presentation formats. Students also write an original research paper on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: ACTG 4282. (Autumn, Winter, Spring).

ACTG 4240 Topics & Cases in Financial Accounting | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4284 Consolidated Financial Statements | 2 Credit Hours

This course introduces the student to the preparation of financial statements in compliance with GAAP when the reporting entity has investments in other entities that are other than passive investments. This module explores the financial reporting issues relating to partial or full ownership of one business entity by another. It includes use of the equity method as well as issues involved in reporting the financial results of consolidated entities, both at and subsequent to acquisition or formation. PREREQ or COREQ: ACTG 4282 or ACTG 3068. (Autumn, Spring).

ACTG 4284 Consolidated Financial Statements | 2 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4285 Accounting for Foreign Operations | 2 Credit Hours

Topics covered in this course include the financial statement impact of doing business in a foreign currency, having foreign subsidiaries or operations, and certain hedging activities. PREREQ or COREQ: ACTG 4282 or ACTG 3068. (Autumn, Spring).

ACTG 4285 Accounting for Foreign Operations | 2 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4607 Not-for-Profit & Government Accounting | 4 Credit Hours

The course will focus on Not-for-profit (NFP) and Governmental (Govt) financial accounting standards and practices employed by governmental and nonprofit organizations. Upon successful completion of the course, students will master the fundamentals of financial reporting of various kinds of governmental accounting and nonprofit organizations. Social, environmental, and ethical issues are addressed in this course. The content of Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting will be linked to sustainability, leadership and governance. PREREQ: ACTG 4281. (Autumn, Winter, Spring)

ACTG 4607 Not-for-Profit & Government Accounting | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4620 Accounting Ethics | 4 Credit Hours

This course focuses on the idea of “community” and the ethical and social relationships of accounting leaders and business organizations in their communities. The focus will be on the role of the accounting professional and the unique and special responsibilities associated with that role. This will be examined by analyzing a variety of issues that students will face during their careers. The goal is to provide students with generalized understanding and skills that can be employed in dealing with other issues that may emerge in their accounting and business careers. Many of these issues that emerge directly relate to the state Code of Professional Conduct applicable to CPAs, the Code provisions will be discussed and analyzed. (Winter, Summer).

ACTG 4620 Accounting Ethics | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4700 Special Topics (topics vary by quarter) | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4710 Managing the Family Business | 4 Credit Hours

Family enterprises have a tremendous impact on our local, national and global economies. Today, the definition of the family enterprise extends beyond just the business entity. It includes family offices, family “banks,” family councils, trusts, and family foundations, just to name a few. Further, what happens in, and how decisions are made by, family enterprise affects not only the active family members but other key stakeholders such as inactive family members, in-laws, non-family managers and employees, professional advisors, customers, suppliers and competitors. This course gives students insight into the universe of possibilities that families, enterprises and their advisors face when engaged in systemic transition planning. This highly interdisciplinary course is appropriate for anyone who intends to work in or with family enterprises. This includes family members, accountants, attorneys, estate planners, financial or wealth managers, family office professionals, insurance consultants, business advisors, management consultants, organizational and leadership development experts, international business professionals, psychologists, social workers, and family therapists. (Winter)

ACTG 4710 Managing the Family Business | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4720 Corporate Advisory | 4 Credit Hours

Corporate Advisory is a project-based practicum experience (field study) whereby student teams will gain an in-depth perspective of managerial and strategic processes within an actual company (hereafter, corporate partner). Teams will spend the quarter working on a specific consulting project in close collaboration with executives of the corporate partner. The project will have important accounting and financial implications and will culminate with a formal presentation of the conclusions reached by the team. The work of the team and the consulting relationship with the corporate partner is supervised by the faculty instructor(s) of the course. PREREQ: Instructor Approval. (Autumn, Spring)

ACTG 4720 Corporate Advisory | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4740 Valuation and Modeling | 4 Credit Hours

The ultimate purpose of the course is to improve professional decision-making skills. Professional decisions are made using a combination of judgment and analysis. Even skilled professionals (in any field) will make incorrect decisions when working with incorrect or insufficient information. Thus, one key to improving decision-making is improving analytical insights and skills. This course will emphasize the definition, construction, uses and limitations of popular financial models and instruments. Further, the class will focus on how the instruments are used, why they are used and how decisions to use such instruments and tools/techniques to value them are made. (Autumn, Spring).

ACTG 4740 Valuation and Modeling | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4750 Valuing a Business Valuation | 4 Credit Hours

This course explores all major aspects of business valuation, focusing on the valuation of closely held businesses. Students study the three methods of valuation, their strengths and weaknesses, and when to apply each. Topics include: 1) standards of value, 2) levels of value, including valuation discounts and premiums, 3) valuation methodologies, 4) evaluation and analysis of data, 5) critical assumptions, and 6) professional report writing. Students not only study valuation theory, they appraise an actual business and draft a valuation report in compliance with the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants’ Statement on Standards for Valuation Services (SSVS) and the Reporting Standards of the National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts (NACVA). PREREQ: ACTG 4740. (Autumn, Spring)

ACTG 4750 Valuing a Business Valuation | 4 Credit Hours»

ACTG 4760 CEO’s & Corporate Governance | 4 Credit Hours

The course examines the current and pressing issue of corporate governance, in its ethical, legal, and social dimensions. Students read the latest views of scholars and experts and gain the perspectives of corporate CEOs and other organization leaders. Topics explored include the history of various governance models, public policy on corporate governance, corporate board functions and responsibilities, the dynamics between CEOs and boards, ethical leadership and corporate culture, ethics and compliance programs, executive liability, nonprofit corporate governance, board and audit committee responsibilities, restructuring and governance, executive compensation problems and solutions, shareholder activism, and corporate governance reforms. (Spring)

ACTG 4760 CEO’s & Corporate Governance | 4 Credit Hours»

LGST 4550 Business Law for Accountants | 4 Credit Hours

This course will provide students with a detailed review of the legal considerations in forming, operating, and dissolving the most common forms of business entities: partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. The rights, duties and liabilities of the managers, owners and accountants (internal and external) of these entities will be extensively examined. The course will also provide an overview of federal securities laws impacting these organizations. (Autumn, Spring)

LGST 4550 Business Law for Accountants | 4 Credit Hours»

BUS 4310 Business Communication for Accountants | 4 Credit Hours

This course emphasizes critical communications skills for future accounting, tax, auditing and consulting professionals. The course develops written communication skills including but not limited to technical writing, reporting the results of research and explaining complex issues. Oral communication assignments include formal presentations, development of debate skills and boardroom presence. Assignments incorporate business etiquette and teambuilding. (Autumn, Spring)

BUS 4310 Business Communication for Accountants | 4 Credit Hours»

Business Information & Analytics

The Business Information and Analytics Certificate from Daniels College of Business introduces you to the latest, most effective ways to gain and utilize business intelligence. The certificate courses focus on interactive targeting; how to differentiate your company in today’s Internet-driven, cost-standardizing society and using data to make and support strategic business decisions.

The certificate program consists of 16 credit hours. You’ll take the same graduate-level concentration courses as MBA or master’s degree students at Daniels, but in a time frame that works best for you.

BIA GBC Program 2015-2016

Courses (choose 4): 

INFO 4100 Survey of Business Analytics | 4 Credit Hours

This course provides an overview of business analytics: how business data is collected, processed, and analyzed to support decision making. It will address both how to assess and use data that is readily available as well as how to start with corporate strategy and determine what data is needed, how to generate and process it. The course will also explore how corporate culture, ethics, and globalization can affect data management and analytic decision-making.

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Describe the core elements of the corporate decision-making process.
  2. Learn the principles and application of data modeling in a business setting.
  3. Construct and evaluate data models for a data warehouse with data marts.
  4. Summarize the tools and approaches used in business analytics to support decision-making.
  5. Understand how ethics, privacy, security, and international and cultural differences affect the data and analytic environment.

INFO 4100 Business Intelligence | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4140 Business Databases | 4 Credit Hours

This is an introductory database course which will cover enterprise database design, modeling and implementation. Students with existing proficiency in databases can substitute another BIA graduate course.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Understand, create, normalize, and use relational database models.
  2. Use SQL to define, load, query, and modify databases.
  3. Use SQL Server 2012 to create SQL code to build, populate and query databases.

INFO 4140 Business Databases | 4 Credit Hours»

STAT 4610 Business Statistics | 4 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to the basic analytical tools in statistics and business analytics, and provides the theoretical concepts and skills that are building blocks for future courses. The approach is to present students with a “corporate” view of how statistical tools are used to analyze data and facilitate business decision-making. Students will familiarize themselves with all of the statistical techniques and models presented in the course and will demonstrate knowledge in applying the appropriate techniques and models to various data sets and interpreting the results of the analysis. The Microsoft Excel Data Analysis and Solver Toolkits will be used to conduct statistical analyses, allowing students to become more proficient overall in using Microsoft Excel and to place their emphasis on applications to core business disciplines, statistical reasoning, and proper interpretation of results.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Learn and understand the basic tenets of probability distributions, and be familiar with the distributions most often used in business modeling.
  2. Conduct and interpret various statistical hypothesis testing techniques on single and multiple populations.
  3. Conduct and interpret various regression analyses on single and multiple independent variables.
  4. Conduct and interpret optimization modeling in a variety of business scenarios.
  5. Use the results of statistical analysis to support business decisions.
  6. Construct analytic models, to include multiple regression and simulation models, and apply them in the functional areas of business such as finance, accounting, marketing, and operations.
  7. Demonstrate proficiency in performing data management, statistical analysis, and analytic modeling in a spreadsheet environment.

STAT 4610 Business Statistics | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4240 Data Warehousing | 4 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to the main components of a data warehouse for business intelligence applications. Students will learn how a data warehouse fits into the overall strategy of a complex enterprise, how to develop data models useful for business intelligence, and how to combine data from disparate sources into a single database that comprises the core of a data warehouse. Students will also explore how to define and specify useful management reports from warehouse data. Prerequisites: INFO 4100, INFO 4140.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Gather requirements and model a data warehouse with data marts to meet the requirements.
  2. Design a data warehouse and data marts given a model.
  3. Describe several current data architectures, the strengths and weaknesses of each.
  4. Create a strategy to extract, transform (cleanse, integrate, and qualify) and load data from operational databases into the data warehouse.
  5. List the tradeoffs a business must consider in selecting the target level of data quality, completeness and integration.
  6. Utilize common tools which support the components of the data warehouse.

INFO 4240 Data Warehousing | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4280 Project Management | 4 Credit Hours

In this course students examine the science, practice the art, and discuss the folklore of project management to enable them to contribute to and manage projects as well as to judge when to apply this discipline. The course also covers the use of MS Project Professional as a management tool and Crystal Ball as a Monte Carlo simulator for project exercises.

Prerequisite: INFO 4100

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Apply project management—consistently making the tradeoffs required to derive optimal outcomes based on copious hands-on experience.
  2. Justify flexibility in at least one of the three project constraints: scope, timeframe and resources, in order to deliver worthwhile results.
  3. Plan projects to optimize project results while taking into account the fact that projects seldom are executed according to plan.
  4. Find creative ways to bring projects back on schedule, explaining why simply throwing more resources at the problem tends to push the project further behind schedule.
  5. Demonstrate the advantages of the critical chain approach to managing projects while addressing its biggest challenge of getting stakeholder buy-in.
  6. Assess the value of formally executing the close step of any project in capturing information valuable for future projects.
  7. Compare and contrast the use of probability distributions versus point estimates for all critical project variables.
  8. Delineate the costs and benefits of using formal project management software tools such as Microsoft Project Professional.

INFO 4280 Project Management | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4300 Predictive Analytics | 4 Credit Hours | Fall and Spring Quarter

This course is designed to prepare students for managerial data analysis and data mining, predictive modeling, model assessment and implementation using large data sets. The course addresses the how, when, why, and where of data mining. The emphasis is on understanding the application of a wide range of modern techniques to specific decision-making situations, rather than on mastering the theoretical underpinnings of the techniques. The course covers methods that are aimed at prediction, forecasting, classification, clustering, and association. Students will gain hands-on experience in using computer software to mine business data sets. Prerequisite: STAT 4610.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify and perform the steps in the data mining process.
  2. Explain, apply and interpret forecasting models, component analysis, and classification methods.
  3. Explain, apply, and interpret regression models, generalized linear models, logistic regression models, and hierarchical linear models.
  4. Understand the various time series analysis techniques available to the business modeler, and conduct time series analysis to improve business decision-making.

INFO 4300 Predictive Analytics | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4340 Data Mining & Visualization | 4 Credit Hours

In this course, students create business intelligence tools such as balanced scorecards, data visualization and dashboards to inform business decisions. The course will focus on the identification of metrics, measures, indicators and key performance indicators for a variety of business operations. The focus will be on the advantages and disadvantages of various modeling methodologies and implementations moving towards performance improvement. Prerequisite: STAT 4610.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. List the components of a balanced scorecard and their relationship to each other.
  2. Compare and contrast various ways to display and interpret voluminous amounts of business intelligence data.
  3. Assess the potential of key performance indicators for different types of enterprises.
  4. Articulate the value of key business metrics for the success of an enterprise.
  5. Use VBA to construct interactive scorecards, dashboards, and data visualization.
  6. Explain, apply and interpret discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, principal component analysis, and neural network models.

INFO 4340 Data Mining & Visualization | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4360 Complex Data Analytics | 4 Credit Hours | Fall & Spring Quarter

This course explores the concepts of the considerations and management of big data projects. It also explores technical aspects of performing text analytics and natural language processing, network analysis, geographic data analysis. We will focus on social data for many of the examples and also explore how disparate data sources can be combined to provide insight for business decisions.

INFO 4360 Complex Data Analytics | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4380 Decision Processes | 4 Credit Hours

This course addresses the process of decision making in the enterprise: who makes what decisions based on what information and for what purpose. Business Intelligence is premised on the HP motto: “In God we trust. All others bring data.” But what is the cost of collecting and analyzing the data and presenting the results, and what decisions justify that cost? Is the transformation from data to decision always rational, and what are the common pitfalls for human decision makers? We examine the results of recent experiments from behavior economics and their relevance to making business decisions. Prerequisite: INFO 4100.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Analyze enterprise decision processes, identify key participants and assess their relationships to effective execution.
  2. Evaluate the tradeoffs between the costs and benefits of data driven decisions and contrast these with direct experimentation.
  3. List and describe hidden traps in rational decision making such as anchoring, confirmation bias, etc.
  4. Explain the paradox of choice: why more is less, and its impact on business decisions.

INFO 4380 Decision Processes | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4520 Health Informatics | 4 Credit Hours

Annual health care spending in the United States exceeds 16% of GDP ($2 Trillion) and is expected to continue to increase. The effective use of information technology is perceived as an important tool in increasing the access to and quality of health care delivery in a cost effective manner. This course examines the role of health informatics in the health care delivery and management process. The objectives of this course are to familiarize students with the critical issues and challenges faced by those in the health care environment, what technologies are or will soon be available to potentially address these issues and challenges, potential barriers professionals employed in the health care field may face deploying and managing these technologies, and possible strategies to assist these professionals in addressing and overcoming these barriers. This course focuses on four major areas related to health informatics: the role of electronic health records, clinical decision support systems, analytics, and other ehealth initiatives such as mobile technologies and telehealth.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Understand the issues related to the deployment and utilization of electronic health records.
  2. Articulate the strengths and weaknesses associated with clinical decision support systems.
  3. Understand and apply basic analytic techniques to healthcare data.
  4. Develop sample eHealth and mobile technology strategies for an organization.

INFO 4520 Health Informatics | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4540 IT Infrastructure | 4 Credit Hours

TBD

INFO 4540 IT Infrastructure | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4560 Business Processes | 4 Credit Hours

TBD

INFO 4560 Business Processes | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4580 Business Simulations | 4 Credit Hours

TBD

INFO 4580 Business Simulations | 4 Credit Hours»

INFO 4590 Optimization | 4 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to the basic optimization modeling techniques and tools as practiced by business analysts, operations research analysts, data analysts, data scientists, decision scientists, decision support scientists, business intelligence analysts, quants, actuaries, financial analysts, marketing analysts, and anyone else interested in using analytics to improve the bottom line. The course will focus on problem definitions, problem configuration, spreadsheet solution, LP Software (LINGO) solutions, and interpreting and implementing results.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Understand the role that optimization plays in business analytics.
  2. Model optimization problems that involve linear programming, integer programming, binary integer programming, mixed-integer programming, and nonlinear programming.
  3. Use spreadsheet modeling to configure and solve optimization problems.
  4. Configure optimization problems for implementation in a commercial solver package.
  5. Use a commercial solver (LINGO, GAMS, CPLEX, R) to solve optimization problems.

INFO 4590 Optimization | 4 Credit Hours»

Finance

Succeeding in today’s business environment demands an in-depth and actionable understanding of financial complexities. Daniels College of Business offers three Graduate Business Certificates that supply you with the critical financial and technical tools needed to evaluate financial data and make financially sound decisions.

Each certificate program consists of 16 credit hours. You’ll take the same graduate-level concentration courses as MBA or master’s degree students at Daniels, but in a time frame that works best for you.

 

FIN Course Descriptions 2015-2016

Suggested Certificates—Or You May Customize Your Own

Foundations of Finance

Empowers employees at any level to understand, interpret and make strategic decisions based on the financial constitution of a business. You’ll learn how to identify a company’s strengths and weaknesses as revealed by financial statements as well as how to capitalize on that information.

Courses:

ACTG 4610 Financial Accounting | 4 Credit Hours

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the financial statements issued by companies to external parties, such as shareholders and creditors. The course covers the fundamentals of accounting, from recording economic events in the accounting records to the preparation of the company’s financial statements. In addition, the course examines major transaction categories, accounting policy choices of business firms and their financial statement implications, as well as the content of publicly-traded companies’ Form 10-K annual reports. (Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer)

ACTG 4610 Financial Accounting | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4630 Managerial Finance | 4 Credit Hours

This course discusses basic principles of finance and provides practical tools for financial decisions and valuation. The purpose of this course is to give students a thorough introduction to the basics of finance. You will learn how to value distant and uncertain cash flows. You will learn how to apply the tools to make investment decisions for a firm. You will also survey the fundamental drivers of financing policy in a corporation and learn how financial markets interact with businesses. This course is divided into four sections. The first covers the use of financial statements to glean information about the firm, its performance and financial needs. Section II deals with the basic building blocks of financial valuation: time value of money analysis, bond and stock valuation. During the remainder of the course, we turn our attention to applying the tools of valuation to the main types of corporate financial decisions. Section III analyzes firms’ capital budgeting decisions and Section IV considers a company’s investment in working capital. Offered FA, WI, SP and Sum. Prerequisite: ACTG 4610

FIN 4630 Managerial Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4200 Financial Institutions and Markets | 4 Credit Hours

This course is a survey of equity and credit markets.  It is designed to provide an understanding of the financial markets, the securities traded in those markets and the risk-return relationship in the equity and credit markets.  Students will study the distinctions between the various securities traded in these financial markets and determine how each security is priced or valued.  The statistical foundations of risk and return will be explored. A fundamental understanding of the theoretical and empirical foundations of financial asset pricing models will be covered.  Principal content elements will include market efficiency, diversification, the CAPM and Fama-French models, yield to maturity for corporate bonds, the term structure of interest rates, duration and convexity as well as return calculations used in the money market. Offered FA, WI, SP. Prerequisites: FIN 4630 and FIN 4170.

FIN 4200 Financial Institutions and Markets | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4410 Financial Planning and Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

This course builds on the material learned in FIN 4630. It examines the determinants of return on equity and the capital structure decision, with an emphasis on how these affect shareholder value and the value of the firm. Corporate financial planning and sustainable growth will be addressed. Business valuation will be calculated using proforma financial statements to estimate free cash flows in the discounted cash flow approach. Other approaches to business valuation will also be examined. The course will also cover EPS drivers and cash flow statement analysis. PREREQ: FIN 4630 or equivalent. Offered FA, WI, SP, and Sum. Prerequisite: FIN 4630.

FIN 4410 Financial Planning and Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

Corporate Finance

Provides the critical financial and technical knowledge to help you dissect, analyze and interpret corporate financial data to make sound business decisions.

Courses (choose 4):

FIN 4150 Advanced Business Valuation | 4 Credit Hours

The objective of this course is to present advanced valuation techniques to deepen students' understanding and enhance their knowledge of valuation theory and practical application. Prerequisite: FIN 4410. Offered WI or SP

FIN 4150 Advanced Business Valuation | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4160 Treasury Management | 4 Credit Hours

The objective of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of how various treasury functions are managed in a corporation and build students' capabilities to assume the role of a proficient treasury manager. Prerequisite: FIN 4430. Offered WI or SP.

FIN 4160 Treasury Management | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4410 Financial Planning and Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

This course builds on the material learned in FIN 4630. It examines the determinants of return on equity and the capital structure decision, with an emphasis on how these affect shareholder value and the value of the firm. Corporate financial planning and sustainable growth will be addressed. Business valuation will be calculated using proforma financial statements to estimate free cash flows in the discounted cash flow approach. Other approaches to business valuation will also be examined. The course will also cover EPS drivers and cash flow statement analysis. PREREQ: FIN 4630 or equivalent. Offered FA, WI, SP, and Sum. Prerequisite: FIN 4630.

FIN 4410 Financial Planning and Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4420 Capital Expenditures Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

This course will show you how managers of large corporations create value for their owners. The major focus of the course will be on capital investment decisions are made, but several ways to create value, such as the decision to lease or buy an asset and merger decisions will also be examined. A manager’s ability to create shareholder value through asset acquisitions depends upon having defined appropriate criteria for making accept / reject decisions. These criteria must, therefore, be firmly grounded in financial theory. Thus, much of the course will be devoted to an examination of those aspects of the theory of finance relevant to creating value from making asset investment decisions. Offered FA, WI, SP. Prerequisite: FIN 4630.

FIN 4420 Capital Expenditures Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4870 Strategic Finance | 4 Credit Hours

Addresses theory, concepts, and techniques associated with asset management and creation of value from a strategic orientation. Links financial theory and practice to strategic and operational objectives of the firm, prepares student to incorporate risk and uncertainty into analytical decision-making process and to analyze divestiture, restructuring, and liquidation decisions. Prerequisites: FIN 4840. Offered FA, SP.

FIN 4870 Strategic Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4885 External Finance | 4 Credit Hours

This is an advanced Corporate Finance course, focusing on the decisions by companies related to external sources of financing. There will be a mix of theory and practice, with many outside speakers providing insight into the practice component. External financing will be examined in the context of several different situations and contexts, including the different sources used as the company moves through its life cycle. Throughout the class, we will relate financial decision making to the ethical and regulatory issues embodied in the Dodd-Frank Act. Learning outcomes include: understanding and describing the current economic and financial environment; understanding the role of the economic and financial environment on the debt/ equity decision; understanding the sources of startup capital and angel investing; understanding the bank loan application and evaluation process; understanding the role and timing of venture capital and  private equity in external financing;  understanding the decision and process involved in going private; understanding the merger and acquisition process as a way to finance growth; and  understanding  the external financing alternatives and process in situations of financial distress or bankruptcy. Prerequisite: FIN 4410. Offered WI and Sum.

FIN 4885 External Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

Investment Management

Expands your knowledge of investment management focusing on arbitrage relationships, pricing and valuing securities, measuring portfolio performance and long-term and tactical asset allocation.

Courses (choose 4):

FIN 4120 Quantitative Methods in Stock Selection | 4 Credit Hours

This course introduces quantitative methods and techniques applied to alpha generation in stock selection. It enables students to better understand and conceptualize the entire quantitative investment process in the context of a simulated long/short equity portfolio. The student learns to set investment objectives, test investment hypotheses, define security selection criteria and construct portfolios using quantitative techniques. This is a practical class held in a lab environment using financial industry tools and data with a strong emphasis on student participation. Students have to define and defend a quantitative investment strategy and implement it in a simulated portfolio environment. Offered SP.

FIN 4120 Quantitative Methods in Stock Selection | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4320 Security Analysis and Valuation | 4 Credit Hours

This course focuses on (i) analytical models of investment valuation—the discounted cash flow models, relative valuation models, and contingent claim pricing models; (ii) collecting, analyzing, and interpreting financial information; (iv) producing industry-standard financial analyst research reports on stocks; and (iv) developing investment strategies based on research papers and the latest innovations in finance.  Prerequisite: FIN 4200. Offered FA, WI, SP & SU.

FIN 4320 Security Analysis and Valuation | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4330 Portfolio Management | 4 Credit Hours

This course covers four major areas with a strong emphasis on financial modeling and quantitative techniques as they apply the tenets of portfolio theory to “real life” portfolio management: Modern Portfolio Theory; Portfolio Construction Methods; Risk Measurement and Analysis; Portfolio Performance Measurement and Return Attribution. Offered WI, SP. Prerequisite: FIN 4200.

FIN 4330 Portfolio Management | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4700 Asset Management in New York

This course will provide firsthand exposure to the New York Global Market. Students will learn about the following aspects of asset management – investment management, equity research, sales and trading, private wealth management, hedge funds, and market research. Students will then spend a week in New York visiting a variety of firms to learn from the individuals who are engaged in these activities in New York. Offered FA. Prerequisite: FIN 4200.

FIN 4700 Asset Management in New York»

FIN 4700 Investment Banking in New York

This course will provide firsthand exposure to the New York Global Market. Students will learn about many aspects of investment banking, including strategic advisory, equity and bond underwriting, IPO’s, leveraged finance, high yield debt, mergers and acquisitions, and private equity. Students will then spend a week in New York visiting a variety of firms to learn from the individuals who are engaged in these activities in New York. Offered SU. Prerequisite: FIN 4410.

FIN 4700 Investment Banking in New York»

FIN 4710/4720 Marsico Investment Fund I | 4 Credit Hours Each

A securities analysis and portfolio management practicum in which students manage a University endowment gift donated by Tom and Cydney Marsico. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (First part of two-quarter course.) Instructor Permission Required. Offered FA, WI, SP, SUM.

FIN 4710/4720 Marsico Investment Fund I | 4 Credit Hours Each»

FIN 4730 Marsico Investment Fund III | 4 Credit Hours

This course is an elective course that is the third in the series of classes involving the Graduate investment fund class: Marsico Investment Fund I & II. This course allows students to apply the investment, security analysis, and portfolio management tools and techniques that they have learned in their Finance classes. The students manage an actual portfolio, a portion of the University's endowment originally gifted by Tom and Cydney Marsico. The selection of students for this class is competitive. Students must agree to participate for 2 consecutive quarters, and they must be willing to address portfolio issues during the between-quarter periods if necessary. Because the course involves the application of tools and concepts learned in other classes, the best time to take the course is in the last year of a student's program. Prerequisites: FIN 4710 and FIN 4720. Offered FA, WI, SP, SU.

FIN 4730 Marsico Investment Fund III | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4890 Fixed Income Analysis | 4 Credit Hours

This course provides an in-depth understanding of the basic concepts related to option-free bonds and bonds with imbedded options. Focus will be on a limited number of topics ranging from bond valuation to price volatility. The course is designed so upon completion the student should have an understanding of bond characteristics such as duration and convexity. An understanding of how these items relate in a portfolio context as well. In addition, an awareness of how binomial trees are used to price a broad spectrum of bonds is provided. The student is also expected to have an understanding of how hedging the risk of bond portfolio is accomplished. Prerequisite: FIN 4820. Offered SP.

FIN 4890 Fixed Income Analysis | 4 Credit Hours»

Risk Management

Courses (choose 4):

FIN 4130 Financial Risk Management Strategies | 4 Credit Hours

This course applies risk management, quantitative approaches and investment theoretical models to derivatives markets. It examines the proven risk management and revenue enhancement strategies in derivatives and equity markets, creates innovated derivatives investment styles, validates quantitative strategies in options markets, and implements investment models. This course is to offer advanced graduates in finance a well-rounded exposure to the theory and practice of risk management and derivatives investment strategies. It focuses on four aspects: (1) essential risk management theories regarding asset pricing, portfolio construction, and financial statistics; (2) the approaches to develop risk management and derivatives investment strategies based on the fundamental analysis, statistical analysis, and behavioral finance; (3) the rigorous test of various options investment strategies; and (4) the implementation of risk management and investment strategies based on The Reiman Fund. Prerequisites: FIN 4860 or instructor permission. Offered SP.

FIN 4130 Financial Risk Management Strategies| 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4140 Enterprise Risk Management | 4 Credit Hours

This course introduces the fundamentals of enterprise risk management (ERM). The purpose of this course is to give students an overview of the current approaches used to identify, evaluate and monitor the key risks that an organization faces. Students learn that there are numerous approaches that organizations take in addressing ERM. Over the course of the quarter, a number of outside ERM experts address the class on various aspects of ERM. Students then apply newly gained ERM knowledge to a mock risk assessment developed from a real-life corporate scenario from Newmont Mining Corporation. Offered SP.

FIN 4140 Enterprise Risk Management | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4200 Financial Institutions and Markets | 4 Credit Hours

This course is a survey of equity and credit markets.  It is designed to provide an understanding of the financial markets, the securities traded in those markets and the risk-return relationship in the equity and credit markets.  Students will study the distinctions between the various securities traded in these financial markets and determine how each security is priced or valued.  The statistical foundations of risk and return will be explored. A fundamental understanding of the theoretical and empirical foundations of financial asset pricing models will be covered.  Principal content elements will include market efficiency, diversification, the CAPM and Fama-French models, yield to maturity for corporate bonds, the term structure of interest rates, duration and convexity as well as return calculations used in the money market. Offered FA, WI, SP. Prerequisites: FIN 4630 and FIN 4170.

FIN 4200 Financial Institutions and Markets | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4330 Portfolio Management | 4 Credit Hours

This course covers four major areas with a strong emphasis on financial modeling and quantitative techniques as they apply the tenets of portfolio theory to “real life” portfolio management: Modern Portfolio Theory; Portfolio Construction Methods; Risk Measurement and Analysis; Portfolio Performance Measurement and Return Attribution. Offered WI, SP. Prerequisite: FIN 4200.

FIN 4330 Portfolio Management | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4700 Derivatives and Risk Management in Chicago

This course will offer an overview of derivative securities and introduce students to the practical application of using derivatives in portfolio investment strategies. This class will require students to form portfolios and use derivative instruments to manage risk. We’ll discuss issues pertaining to implementation and performance evaluation of investment strategies using derivatives. Offered FA.

FIN 4700 Derivatives and Risk Management in Chicago»

Applied International Economics

Courses:

FIN 4740 Managerial Microeconomics | 2 Credit Hours

This course emphasizes the standard tools of microeconomic analysis for the business manager. The focus is on managerial decision-making, and to give an appreciation of the important perspectives that form the business environment in the contemporary world. The goal is to provide students with the tools from microeconomics industrial organization that they need to make sound managerial choices. The course will emphasize analytical problem solving to highlight the decisions managers must make under constrained conditions. There will be a series of short quizzes to emphasize these skills based on class lecturers and homework. We will also use case studies to develop practical insights into managing the firm’s resources to achieve competitive advantage. This course is divided into two principal modules based on market structure: perfect competition and imperfect competition. Both modules will cover optimal behavior and strategies.Offered FA, WI, SP.

FIN 4740 Managerial Microeconomics | 2 Credit Hours»

FIN 4750 Managerial Macroeconomics | 2 Credit Hours

This course covers the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics. It teaches students how private market forces and government policy decisions drive fluctuations in the global economy and affect the business environment. It explores issues related to inflation, interest rates, foreign exchange rate, business cycles, and monetary and fiscal policies. The course uses case studies to analyze real-life macroeconomic issues, and students are encouraged to investigate the potential and limitations of macroeconomic theory with real-world problems. The course is divided into two principle modules: the economy in the long run, and the economy in the short run. Both modules cover impacts of government policies on the business environment in a closed economy and an open economy. Offered FA, WI, SP.

FIN 4750 Managerial Macroeconomics | 2 Credit Hours»

FIN 4701-1 Economics and Finance in Emerging Markets | 4 Credit Hours

Emerging Economies in East Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America have grown considerably over the past two decades. Their economic models have become more competitive and open as barriers to trade have fallen. Foreign direct investment and trade has skyrocketed. Financial markets have been largely liberalized in most emerging economies, and their stock and bond markets which were nascent in some cases rival Western Economies. At the same time, many Emerging Markets retain financial and economic characteristics different from American markets, and understanding these differences is critical in doing business in these economies. This course focuses on economic and financial growth, linkages and volatility in Emerging Markets. Instructor permission required. Offered: Quarters TBD.

FIN 4701-1 Economics and Finance in Emerging Markets | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4701-2 Monetary Economics and International Banking | 4 Credit Hours

This course explores the impact of financial markets on interest rates and financial markets. It presents economic models and applies them to current problems that central and commercial bankers face. It discusses the causes and consequences of monetary policy, deregulation and systematic risk across the Globe. Current issues such as shadow banking, international banking and stress tests will be analyzed and discussed. Instructor permission required. Offered: Quarters TBD.

FIN 4701-2 Monetary Economics and International Banking | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4701-3 International Monetary Economics and Financia Crises | 4 Credit Hours

This course focuses on interrelationships between exchange rates, balance of payments, Global economy and financial crises. The goal is to explain the determination of current account surpluses and deficits, and movements in the exchange rate in the short and long-run. The course will explicitly examine different exchange rate regimes as well the in-depth analysis of the biggest event in the Global Economy in 75 years, the Global Financial Crisis. The class begins with an examination of the causes, consequences and aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis. It evaluates why it happened, the lessons, and the warning signs. It then considers exchange rate determination, exchange rate regime choice, exchange rate determination in the medium and long-run, exchange rate misalignment and exchange rate crises including the Asian Financial Crisis and Latin American crises. We then focus on international financial imbalances and currency wars. After this, we consider why the European Union and Euro are trouble. Will the Euro survive intact, is it an Optimal Currency Area and what do the leaders need to do so that the Euro crisis does not spread elsewhere. Lastly, we examine financial conditions/soundness indicators, forecasting and the evolving international financial system, particularly the growing importance of Emerging Asia/China. The course stresses how to evaluate a country’s international financial condition, identify the warning signs, and whether it’s likely to experience a financial crisis in the near future. There have been 200 financial crises over the past 3 decades, and according to MIT’s Andrew Lo “Financial crises may be an unavoidable aspect of modern capitalism.” Banking, currency and debt crises have hit, and will strike again, so can we understand their impact, detect their transmission across borders, assess their potential damage with stress tests, predict them in advance and limit their damage? Instructor permission required. Offered: Quarters TBD.

FIN 4701-3 International Monetary Economics and Financia Crises | 4 Credit Hours»

Additional finance courses available to customize a certificate.

These may be combined with the courses above.

FIN 4170 Quantitative Methods in Finance | 4 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to the mathematical and statistical methods needed in order to succeed in the quantitative discipline of modern finance. Topics include differential calculus, optimization techniques, linear algebra, probability, and statistical methods. Data analysis software is used when appropriate to facilitate the analysis. Emphasis is on applications, analytic reasoning, and proper interpretation of results. Offered FA, WI.

FIN 4170 Quantitative Methods in Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4500 Financial Modeling | 4 Credit Hours

The way we perform financial analysis has been transformed by the availability of PC-based spreadsheet programs such as Microsoft’s Excel and add-in programs that complement Excel such as Crystal Ball. These programs have increased the speed and reliability with which we can do conventional financial analysis and have put time consuming and tedious work such as simulation and optimization within the easy reach of all students of finance. Financial managers today need a good knowledge of financial model building and financial theory. Indeed, financial modeling is rapidly becoming an important part of standard financial analysis. Offered FA, WI, SP and Sum. Prerequisite FIN 4200.

FIN 4500 Financial Modeling | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4610 Multinational Financial Management | 4 Credit Hours

Multinational Finance explores financial management in the international arena. Topics include derivative securities, currency risk, international capital budgeting, and international portfolio management. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to accomplish the following objectives: explain the determinants of foreign exchange rates and how exchange rate risk can be hedged; understand derivatives on currencies; explain and identify the financial difficulties and opportunities faced by corporations when operating internationally; apply advanced techniques for making international corporate investment decisions; identify the determinants of the expected returns on international investments; discuss current issues in international finance. Prerequisite: FIN 4630. Offered FA, WI, SP and Sum.

FIN 4610 Multinational Financial Management | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4830 Econometrics for Finance | 4 Credit Hours

This course focuses on econometric and statistical modeling with an emphasis on finance applications. The objective of this course is to learn essential econometric tools and conduct econometric and other statistical modeling analyses using appropriate computer software. This course will prepare students with quantitative tools necessary for more specialized, advanced courses in finance. (This course will be required of all MS Finance students.) Prerequisite: FIN 4170. Offered FA, SP.

FIN 4830 Econometrics for Finance | 4 Credit Hours»

FIN 4860 Derivatives | 4 Credit Hours

This course provides a theoretical foundation for the pricing of contingent claims and for designing risk-management strategies. It discusses more advanced material in financial derivatives and is intended for students who have a quantitative background and are interested in enhancing their knowledge of the way in which derivatives can be analyzed. This course covers option pricing models, hedging techniques, and trading strategies. It also includes portfolio insurance, value-at-risk measure, multistep binomial trees to value American options, interest rate options, and other exotic options. Prerequisite: FIN 4200. Offered WI, SP.

FIN 4860 Derivatives | 4 Credit Hours»

Health Industry

Healthcare costs continue to rise in the U.S. and globally. The total estimated healthcare expenditures in the U.S. for 2015 is $3.24 trillion. That is over 17 percent of the GDP. Federally sponsored healthcare expense is the largest budget item, accounting for 24 percent of the federal budget compared to 17 percent for the Defense Department. Clearly, the health economy is significant and growing! This is an industry that is ripe for disruption. It is not wonder that healthcare startups raised a record $3.9 billion in venture capital funding in 2015. There is great opportunity but it is a complex industry. Business professionals need to be equipped with an understanding of the industry; its language, business models, influencers and incentives.

Courses:

Choose 16 credit hours or customize your certificate with other courses at Daniels.

The Business of Health (New in Spring 2016!)»
Financial & Risk Management in Health (Coming Soon)
The Marketing of Health (Coming Soon)
Entrepreneurship in the New Health Economy (Coming Soon)

The Business of Health

This survey course will provide a broad overview of the massive health economy. We will begin with a general historical perspective and then look at each major source of revenue. Each week we will review the past, present and future of major contributors to the health economy and highlight new business opportunities. The course material will be presented utilizing a blend of presentations, panel discussions and group exercises. (Spring)

 

Management

Graduate Business Certificates in Management and Leadership from Daniels College of Business challenge management professionals to reach beyond their job descriptions to find new ways to create value for their teams and their companies. The program molds students into leaders who embrace change during uncertain times as a way to build momentum, inspire teams and produce results that are aligned with their organization’s core values.

Each certificate program consists of 16 credit hours. You’ll take the same graduate-level concentration courses as MBA or master’s degree students at Daniels, but in a time frame that works best for you.

MGMT Course Descriptions 2015-16

Suggested Certificates—Or You May Customize Your Own

Strategic Management

Amplify your human resource, marketing and business planning disciplines, and learn how to use deliberate and committed strategies to give your organization staying power. Select four of the courses listed below.

Courses (choose 4):

MGMT 4280 Business Design | 4 Credit Hours

Each student learns an organized approach to rapid design of a business with a sustainable competitive advantage based upon innovations(s) to the business model. That innovation(s) is discovered through an investigation of the existing business models and the competitive landscape including: suppliers, customers, competitors, substitutes and barriers of entry. Specific opportunities are identified through investigation of the following: industry, market, and competition. Opportunities to create competitive advantages are investigated through the design of strategies in: marketing, sales, operations, human capital, social responsibility, financing, corporate governance and technology. The course offers a workshop atmosphere in which students are expected to apply and discuss the various aspects of business planning. The result is a written business plan and presentation to funding sources reflecting a sustainable competitive advantage and creation of a defensible market. Offered WI and SP.

MGMT 4280 Business Design | 4 Credit Hours»

MGMT 4490 Global Strategy | 4 Credit Hours

Management of multinational enterprises; identification, analysis, and discussion of key policy issues for the international manager within various functional areas; home and host country relationships including assessment of political risk, selection of foreign locations, entry and ownership strategy, personnel and staffing considerations, technology transfer, multinational labor relations, organizing for international operations. Offered WI, SU. *IMBA Core.

MGMT 4490 Global Strategy | 4 Credit Hours»

MGMT 4620 Organizational Dynamics | 4 Credit Hours

In this course, you will: (1) understand and develop a set of management and leadership skills critical for effectiveness in high performance work environments; (2) develop the ability to analyze organizations and environments from multiple perspectives; (3) explore policies and practices for facilitating organizational change; (4) become a valued and effective member of a work team; and (5) learn how to incorporate effective communication, critical thinking, creative problem solving, and technology, into organizational behaviors and processes. Offered FA, WI, SP. 

MGMT 4620 Organizational Dynamics | 4 Credit Hours»

MGMT 4630 Strategic Human Resource Management | 4 Credit Hours

This course advances the argument that effective human resource policies will create sustained competitive advantage. To that end, this course will address the effective management of human resources in various policy areas: staffing, diversity, training and development, voice and influence, performance appraisal, and reward systems. Rather than taking a traditional, staff personnel perspective, we will address human resource management from the strategic perspective of a general manager. Prerequisite: MGMT 4620 Offered FA, WI, SP, SU. 

MGMT 4630 Strategic Human Resource Management | 4 Credit Hours»

MGMT 4690 Strategic Management | 4 Credit Hours

This course builds from the premise that managers make decisions that influence the overall success of their organizations. We will concentrate on how top managers create and maximize value for their stakeholders. You will learn about how companies compete against each other in the quest of achieving high performance and market victories. You will learn about how and why some companies are successful while others are not. This course is about strategy. The primary task of strategy is the allocation and commitment of critical resources over relatively long periods of time in pursuit of specific goals and objectives. Strategic decisions take account of the conditions that prevail within the industry environment, both positive and negative, and the resources and capabilities available to managers for meeting environmental challenges. Strategy also requires establishing and managing an internal organizational system that creates and sustains strategic value. Offered FA, WI, SP, SU. 

MGMT 4690 Strategic Management | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4100 Marketing Concepts | 4 Credit Hours

Ever wonder what’s behind those Super Bowl ads we love to watch? Or, how Apple decides the price of its newest electronic wonder? Did you notice you can almost always find what you are looking for at the grocery store, whether it’s in season or out? How does that happen? This course will provide students with a lens through which they may view the world as a consumer and as a marketer, relating marketing principles and models to consumer and business actions. The course will investigate marketing strategy and tactics using contemporary examples from the headlines, active class discussion, and a marketing strategy simulation. ALL QUARTERS

MKTG 4100 Marketing Concepts | 4 Credit Hours»

International Management and Marketing

Gain a broader understanding of international management and operating strategies. You’ll learn how to market products and services abroad, monitor global investments and effectively manage an international workforce. The curriculum is frequently reviewed by industry leaders and experts to ensure it reflects current trends and best practices.Select four of the courses listed below.

Courses (choose 4):

IMBA 4141 Managing Exports | 4 Credit Hours

In this course, students will present information and develop skills for both analyzing markets and selling in international markets.  Major topics will include market assessment, intermediaries, pricing, export licenses, transportation, insurance, documentation, trade barriers and trade zones, financing and methods of payments, and legal and ethical issues.  Students will be assigned a specific product from a local company, which will become the focus of a hands-on approach in completing each step of the export process.  Additionally, several guest lecturers who are practitioners in their fields of expertise will be invited to share their insights.

IMBA 4141 Managing Exports | 4 Credit Hours»

MGMT 4503 Comparative Management | 4 Credit Hours

The course will explore how management theory and practice both affect and are affected by, the cultural environment in which they take place. Culture, in its many dimensions, will be treated as a major determinant of administrative practice and effectiveness – and ultimately business success. Offered FA, SP. *IMBA Core 

MGMT 4503 Comparative Management | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4630 International Marketing | 4 Credit Hours

The shrinking planet and constant pressure to maintain a firm’s growth mean that global marketing continues to grow in importance. This course introduces the various economic, social, cultural, political, and legal dimensions of international marketing from conceptual, methodological and application perspectives, and emphasizes how these factors should affect, and can be integrated into, marketing programs and strategies. This course provides students with methods for analyzing world markets and their respective consumers and environments, and to equip students with the skills in developing and implementing marketing strategies and decision making in international contexts. It includes a combination of lectures and discussions, case analyses of real global marketing issues, videos and readings from the business press, country snapshots, and a group research project in which student teams launch a discrete product in a foreign country of their choice. PREREQ: MKTG 4100, SUMMER ONLINE

MKTG 4630 International Marketing | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4800 Global Integrated Marketing Communications | 4 Credit Hours

The Global IMC class is for graduates who have taken marketing communications classes and want to gain an understanding of how use this knowledge in the global marketplace. It will help students to understand similarities and differences between markets and how to most effectively approach them. What are the IMC tools that work best and how do you use them with cultural sensitivity? The class will feature a number of guest speakers and at least one off-site agency visit. The finale to this high-intensity class will have competing teams creating a global campaign. PREREQ: MKTG 4100, MKTG 4810 or instructor permission WINTER INTERTERM (4 hours), SPRING INTERTERM (2 hours)

MKTG 4800 Global Integrated Marketing Communications | 4 Credit Hours»

EVM 4704 Global Social Entrepreneurship | 4 Credit Hours

It is common knowledge that we now live in a global economy and international business is critical to the survival and success of companies from around the world. This course centers on the management of international operations. The main focus of this course is on exploring the phenomenon of Global Social Entrepreneurship and the cultural, economic and managerial issues critical for succeeding in this field. Unique situations in the form of cases will be discussed with the goal of exposing students to the dynamic, challenging, and complex issues that social entrepreneurs face. Offered Summer.

EVM 4704 Global Social Entrepreneurship | 4 Credit Hours»

Additional management courses available to customize a certificate.

These may be combined with the courses above.

MGMT 4345 Performance & Reward Systems | 4 Credit Hours

Measuring and improving human performance, techniques of individual objective settings including MBO, appraisal and feedback systems, creating and managing compensation programs, job design, analysis and redesign of reward systems in various organizational contexts. Prerequisite: MGMT 4620 or equivalent. Offered FA.

MGMT 4345 Performance & Reward Systems | 4 Credit Hours»

MGMT 4540 Sport/Entertainment Seminar: Sports Issues Management | 4 Credit Hours

Individuals interested in pursuing a career in sports management must have a clear understanding of how various issues impact sport organizations. In some cases, issues can become all encompassing, leading to significant resource allocation focused on one area or topic at the expense of other organizational priorities. This course will delve into issues faced by a selected sport organization and how those issues impacted the company, its key constituents and the public at-large. Additionally, this course will focus on current issues affecting sport management through weekly publication analysis. Offered SP.

MGMT 4540 Sport/Entertainment Seminar: Sports Issues Management | 4 Credit Hours»

MGMT 4700 Topics in Management (topics vary by quarter) | 4 Credit Hours

Topics vary by term: Fall 2013: Narrative Leadership, Teams and Values (a travel course with in class sessions held in Fall quarter, and travel December 1-7); Winter 2014: Managerial Consulting; NGOs and Business; Spring 2014: Social Entrepreneurship; Disaster Capitalism.

MGMT 4700 Topics in Management (topics vary by quarter) | 4 Credit Hours»

Marketing

Graduate Business Certificates in Marketing from Daniels College of Business allow you to gain expertise in a specific marketing discipline such as digital marketing, customer experience, integrated marketing communications and strategy. Or, you can study the big picture and learn how to create a long-term marketing strategy that encompasses all of these areas.

Each certificate program consists of 16 credit hours. You’ll take the same graduate-level concentration courses as MBA or master’s degree students at Daniels, but in a time frame that works best for you.

Course Descriptions»

Suggested Certificates—Or You May Customize Your Own

Digital Marketing

The digital marketing certificate allows graduate students or professionals who hold a bachelor’s degree the opportunity to learn deeply about mobile marketing, social media marketing, digital metrics and search, digital branding, as well as an overall introduction to the fundamentals of digital marketing. 

Courses:

MKTG 4805 Introduction to Digital Marketing | 4 Credit Hours

This course provides a snapshot view of the corporate real estate life cycle and how to strategically plan and manage it. The course addresses key CRE issues including globalization, technology, sustainability and the enterprise business model. Within the framework of a corporate or agency structure, facility management is addressed as a distinct and critical component of successful performance. Topics include facility planning and forecasting, lease administration, space planning, allocation, and management, workplace planning, budgeting, and economic justification, real estate acquisition and disposal, sustainability management, construction project management, move, add, change (MAC) management, operations, maintenance and repair, technology management, emergency, security and life-safety management, and general administrative services.

MKTG 4805 Introduction to Digital Marketing | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4820 Brand Management | 4 Credit Hours

Brands are valued assets for businesses. Building and maintaining strong, valuable brands represent core responsibilities of brand managers. Brand management encompasses brand audits, elements, attitudes, beliefs, images and equity that customers associate with a company’s branded offerings. This course focuses on concepts, tools, techniques and strategies for creating, building, measuring, maintaining and managing strong, valuable brands in today’s complex marketing landscape. PREREQ: MKTG 4100, WINTER, SUMMER

MKTG 4820 Brand Management | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4815 Social Media Marketing | 4 Credit Hours

Social media marketing is an evolving field with consumers driving the changes marketers are seeing. Based on your business model, social media may be more than just distribution and prosumers may be a part of your long-term business strategy. We'll illuminate the increasing importance of social media as it relates to consumer behavior and the purchase cycle. We will also develop a strategic model for a diverse range of businesses (B2B, B2C, Product, Service, Online, Online with Brick and Mortar) that will empower you as a marketer to determine your best strategy. WINTER, SPRING

MKTG 4815 Social Media Marketing | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4825 Mobile Marketing | 4 Credit Hours

Due to the explosion of Smartphones, Mobile Commerce, Social Media and Location-based Services such as Foursquare, mobile marketing is the next frontier! Learning to harness this ever-evolving field is essential for business students. This course will enable students to build creative mobile marketing campaigns that complement digital and traditional marketing strategies. This fast-paced course is a must for people interested in marketing and business. WINTER, SPRING

MKTG 4825 Mobile Marketing | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4835 Search Engine Marketing: Google Analytics & AdWorks | 4 Credit Hours

The digital marketing landscape has hundreds of tools that marketers can utilize to increase revenue, execute on strategies and develop deep brands. This course will review the most essential of those tools; Google Analytics and Google AdWords. Our goal is to enable students to attain individual certification. By partnering with the businesses in our internship program, we ensure that you will be mastering these most sought after tools/skills. This course is fast-paced and has a real world focus! SUMMER, FALL, SPRING

MKTG 4835 Search Engine Marketing: Google Analytics & AdWorks | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4845 Tech in Marketing: Design Tools and Digital Foundations | 4 Credit Hours

“Software is eating the world.”

That was the quote from Marc Andreesen way back in 2011. His point was now that software had disrupted the tech industry, it was now evolving into every other industry. Agriculture. Mass transit. Construction. Everything. This prediction has become true with companies like Google and Uber. We’re at a point where coding/technology are now a matter of literacy. We are going to work together as a class to make you more literate. We are going to learn how to utilize digital design tools such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator to create brand imagery. We’ll then move on to learn HTML and CSS, the building blocks of the Internet. This will be a tactical, hands-on class. FALL, WINTER

MKTG 4845 Tech in Marketing: Design Tools and Digital Foundations | 4 Credit Hours»

Integrated Marketing Strategy

Learn how to develop a strategy for forging relationships with customers in an ever-changing marketing landscape. Courses focus on effective techniques to integrate and coordinate all marketing tools and methods to deliver bottom-line results.

Courses:

MKTG 4100 Marketing Concepts | 4 Credit Hours

Ever wonder what’s behind those Super Bowl ads we love to watch? Or, how Apple decides the price of its newest electronic wonder? Did you notice you can almost always find what you are looking for at the grocery store, whether it’s in season or out? How does that happen? This course will provide students with a lens through which they may view the world as a consumer and as a marketer, relating marketing principles and models to consumer and business actions. The course will investigate marketing strategy and tactics using contemporary examples from the headlines, active class discussion, and a marketing strategy simulation. ALL QUARTERS

MKTG 4100 Marketing Concepts | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4510 Concepts of Buyer Behavior | 4 Credit Hours

What makes consumers tick? This course draws on a variety of sources, including concepts and models from psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics, to offer helpful frameworks for understanding why consumers buy what they buy. These concepts are applied to real-world situations to give students practice at making better product, promotion, pricing, and distribution decisions based on consumer insights. FALL, SPRING

MKTG 4510 Concepts of Buyer Behavior | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4520 Marketing Metrics | 4 Credit Hours

There’s no escape; even marketing managers need to understand financials. This course is designed to introduce MS Marketing students to the principles of financial decision-making and the use of marketing metrics, including customer lifetime value (CLV). Students will learn how to compute marketing ROI and how to make marketing decisions that enhance the bottom line. PREREQ: MKTG 4100, WINTER

MKTG 4520 Marketing Metrics | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4530 Marketing Research | 4 Credit Hours

Understanding consumers requires careful observation and thoughtful questions. Marketing research represents a methodology for getting the answers needed to be successful in business. This course introduces students to a broad array of marketing research tools, including focus groups, ethnographic studies, survey research, and experiments. Students will learn how and when to apply these tools, as well as how to interpret the results to make sound marketing decisions. Prerequisites: MKTG 4100 SPRING

MKTG 4530 Marketing Research | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4550 Marketing Planning | 4 Credit Hours

It has been said that “planning without action is futile, and action without planning is fatal.” The objective of this course is to enable students to utilize a rigorous planning process to develop action-oriented marketing programs. This activity involves an integrated application of concepts and theories characterized by the logical use of facts -- leading to alternatives -- leading to actions. By the end of the course students should be able to develop effective marketing programs, and to understand the strength and limitations of the principal planning tools a marketing manager has at his/her disposal. The skills developed in this class are particularly important because many organizations now use the marketing plan as the basis for developing the business plan. In fact, marketing-developed plans often must precede the subsequent decisions in planning production, finance, and other corporate activities. Each student will apply the planning process, develop an action plan, and identify specific marketing outcomes for an existing or prospective enterprise. The course utilizes current practices, contemporary exemplars, and rigorous communication/presentation platforms. PREREQ: Within one quarter of graduation or instructor’s permission NOT OFFERED IN 15-16

MKTG 4550 Marketing Planning | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4560 Pricing Strategy | 4 Credit Hours

This course will provide an overview of all aspects of Pricing, a key driver of growth and profitability. As one of the 4 “Ps” of Marketing, attention and interest in Pricing is growing. This is not surprising, given that Price is the one “P” that drives the topline, with a direct impact on on revenue growth, customer growth, market share, and profitability. This Pricing survey course will examine established and emerging pricing strategies and principles. In addition, students will learn some basic analytical tools that can be applied to pricing strategy decisions and explore approaches to optimize the impact of pricing strategies and tactics, including segmentation, addressing the competition, and communicating value. PREREQ: MKTG 4100 NOT OFFERED IN 15-16

MKTG 4560 Pricing Strategy | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4630 International Marketing | 4 Credit Hours

The shrinking planet and constant pressure to maintain a firm’s growth mean that global marketing continues to grow in importance. This course introduces the various economic, social, cultural, political, and legal dimensions of international marketing from conceptual, methodological and application perspectives, and emphasizes how these factors should affect, and can be integrated into, marketing programs and strategies. This course provides students with methods for analyzing world markets and their respective consumers and environments, and to equip students with the skills in developing and implementing marketing strategies and decision making in international contexts. It includes a combination of lectures and discussions, case analyses of real global marketing issues, videos and readings from the business press, country snapshots, and a group research project in which student teams launch a discrete product in a foreign country of their choice. PREREQ: MKTG 4100, SUMMER ONLINE

MKTG 4630 International Marketing | 4 Credit Hours»

Integrated Marketing Communication

Understand how a company can control and influence every message, including social and mobile media messages, that might affect its image through synergistic strategies instead of stratospheric spending. A leader in the field of integrated marketing communications, Daniels is the only business college in the country to offer a certificate in this marketing discipline.

Courses: 

MKTG 4510 Concepts of Buyer Behavior | 4 Credit Hours

What makes consumers tick? This course draws on a variety of sources, including concepts and models from psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics, to offer helpful frameworks for understanding why consumers buy what they buy. These concepts are applied to real-world situations to give students practice at making better product, promotion, pricing, and distribution decisions based on consumer insights. FALL, SPRING

MKTG 4510 Concepts of Buyer Behavior | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4800 Global Integrated Marketing Communications | 4 Credit Hours

The Global IMC class is for graduates who have taken marketing communications classes and want to gain an understanding of how use this knowledge in the global marketplace. It will help students to understand similarities and differences between markets and how to most effectively approach them. What are the IMC tools that work best and how do you use them with cultural sensitivity? The class will feature a number of guest speakers and at least one off-site agency visit. The finale to this high-intensity class will have competing teams creating a global campaign. PREREQ: MKTG 4100, MKTG 4810 or instructor permission WINTER INTERTERM (4 hours), SPRING INTERTERM (2 hours)

MKTG 4800 Global Integrated Marketing Communications | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4810 Integrated Marketing Communication | 4 Credit Hours

Marketers must successfully communicate to consumers to be successful. Integrated Marketing Communications represents the latest approach to this process. This course focuses on how to integrate marketing messages by using brand management as the foundation of creating effective marketing communications. To get a broad perspective on the topic, students will read and discuss both classic and contemporary books on marketing communications. Looking at more than traditional advertising, the class also discusses how social media, outdoor, mobile, product placement, and event marketing are all changing the marketing communications process. The course work focuses on three cases, including a presentation of a proposed advertising campaign. PREREQ: MKTG 4100, FALL

MKTG 4810 Integrated Marketing Communication | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4820 Brand Management | 4 Credit Hours

Brands are valued assets for businesses. Building and maintaining strong, valuable brands represent core responsibilities of brand managers. Brand management encompasses brand audits, elements, attitudes, beliefs, images and equity that customers associate with a company’s branded offerings. This course focuses on concepts, tools, techniques and strategies for creating, building, measuring, maintaining and managing strong, valuable brands in today’s complex marketing landscape. WINTER M/W 8PM, SPRING Online. May also be offered summer 2015 as local travel course, 2 weeks every morning.

MKTG 4820 Brand Management | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4850 IMC Campaign | 4 Credit Hours

This course builds on all of the courses in the IMC program/concentration as well as other courses offered through the Department of Marketing. In this sense, it is a capstone course, integrating the knowledge and experience acquired through these other courses. Integration is the primary objective of this course—that is, to develop skills in integrating content from other courses into a complete IMC campaign for a brand of the student’s choice. IMC Campaign is a major project course with a single significant outcome, the IMC Campaign. The project is conducted in a team environment with the guidance of the instructor. PREREQ: MKTG 4810 or instructor permission. SPRING

MKTG 4850 IMC Campaign | 4 Credit Hours»

Customer Experience Management

Learn how to create and sustain the optimal customer experience to generate long-term benefits for your customers and company, how to design and implement financial systems that support successful customer experience operations and how to evaluate the success of customer experience marketing systems.

Courses: 

MKTG 4220 Introduction to Customer Experience Management | 4 Credit Hours

In their best-selling book, The Experience Economy, Pine and Gilmore set the stage for what today’s organizations are facing—customers that connect with brands on the basis of the experiences they receive: products and service are no longer a sufficient differentiator. This course takes the student beyond the ‘better product, better service’ approach to the cutting edge concepts of customer experience management (CEM). It provides an understanding of CEM, its best practices, and the tools for its implementation and evaluation. The course considers the challenges of creating and delivering customer experiences in a variety of settings—in-store operations, branded products, and web-based operations. One of the special features of this course is the use of live, case studies from a variety of companies. Among the companies recently represented by guest speakers are Charles Schwab, Comcast, Cox Communication, Starbucks, 24HR Fitness, Frontier Airlines, eBags, and others. FALL, WINTER

MKTG 4220 Introduction to Customer Experience Management | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4240 Advanced CEM Integration | 4 Credit Hours

A key component of every successful customer experience management (CEM) program is the ability to integrate CEM, marketing, financial, and information systems information, concepts, and processes into a successful operation for the customer and the company. This course provides the student with the tools to evaluate the success of customer experience management systems through conducting the CEM Audit. He or she will apply the CEM Audit to evaluate the level of company achievement of CEM goals and objectives. This course builds on Customer Experience Management, MKTG 4220, as well as other courses in marketing and business. Synthesis is a higher-level form of learning allowing you to combine knowledge from different areas into the CEM audit. Recognizing how one idea may work in another situation is a skill you will use in your management career and one that we will develop in this course. In this sense, it is a capstone course, integrating the knowledge and experience acquired through other courses and your life and business experiences. Developing skills in assessment of an organization against CEM standards is the primary objective of this course. PREREQ: MKTG 4220 NOT OFFERED IN 15-16

MKTG 4240 Advanced CEM Integration | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4540 Product and Service Innovation | 4 Credit Hours

Developing and introducing new products and services are the lifeblood for companies and a primary responsibility of product management. This course focuses on the timeframe beginning with identifying market opportunities for new products and services through to market launch, with particular attention paid to managing project and processes milestones from inception to introduction. The course addresses how marketing managers can overcome the poor success rates for most introductions and increase odds for achieving higher success rates more frequently. PREREQ: MKTG 4100 or instructor’s permission SPRING

MKTG 4540 Product and Service Innovation | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4705 Co-creating the Customer Experience | 4 Credit Hours

What do Apple Inc., Harley Davidson and Starbucks have in common? They all collaborate with customers to co-create a unique customer experience that extends far beyond a specific transaction. These companies focus on engaging customers as partners, supporting brand communities and forming consumer cultures to establish meaningful and lasting brands in an increasingly competitive marketplace. This course explores the role that customers play in designing, developing and maintaining the customer experience. Students will learn what firms can do to better engage with customers in co-creating the customer experience both on- and off-line. WINTER

MKTG 4705 Co-creating the Customer Experience | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4820 Brand Management | 4 Credit Hours

Brands are valued assets for businesses. Building and maintaining strong, valuable brands represent core responsibilities of brand managers. Brand management encompasses brand audits, elements, attitudes, beliefs, images and equity that customers associate with a company’s branded offerings. This course focuses on concepts, tools, techniques and strategies for creating, building, measuring, maintaining and managing strong, valuable brands in today’s complex marketing landscape. WINTER M/W 8PM, SPRING Online. May also be offered summer 2015 as local travel course, 2 weeks every morning.

MKTG 4820 Brand Management | 4 Credit Hours»

Additional marketing courses available to customize a certificate.

These may be combined with the courses above.

MKTG 4660 Sports and Entertainment Marketing | 4 Credit Hours

There are few products for which consumers are more passionate than their sports and entertainment expenditures, so this topic is always an exciting one in marketing. This course provides an in-depth look at the processes and practices of marketing sports, concerts, film and other entertainment. The course emphasizes the practical use of advertising, promotion and public relations in creating athlete or entertainer images, providing a quality fan experience, promoting sponsorships or driving event ticket sales. Participation in a current sports marketing project provides context for graduate students to apply the theories to real situations. PREREQ: MKTG 4100, SPRING, SUMMER

MKTG 4660 Sports and Entertainment Marketing | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4705 Topics: Current Marketing Perspectives | 4 Credit Hours

Like most disciplines, marketing is evolving constantly. One can learn about marketing and its classic terms and notions by reading a textbook. But to familiarize oneself with the current pressing issues, emerging ideas, and innovative applications, one must consult both industry practitioners and academic gurus. In this course, students and faculty will meet and interview several top business executives in Denver area as well as visit their facilities. Such interaction with the managers and faculty will help the students understand the interface of theory and application. In addition, by identifying the current issues in marketing and learning how to develop strategies to handle them, students add to their preparation for the job market. WINTER AND SPRING INTERTERMS

MKTG 4705 Current Marketing Perspectives | 4 Credit Hours»

MKTG 4705 Topics: International Consumer Behavior | 4 Credit Hours

The focus of this course is to introduce the complex role that consumer behavior and consumption plays within an international context. Knowledge of customers is one of the cornerstones for developing sound business strategies, and there is a need to better understand the diverse aspects of consumer behavior that marketers must cater to in the global marketplace. As the study of consumer behavior draws upon marketing, psychology, economics, anthropology, and other disciplines, the added complexity of understanding it beyond ones’ home market results in additional challenges and opportunities. Consumer behavior attempts to understand the consumption activities of individuals as opposed to markets, and as this course will demonstrate, consumption activities are not universal.

The course will focus on both consumer behavior theory, as well as the integration of regional, global, and cultural variables that marketers must account for in developing marketing programs in strategies. Topics such as global consumer culture, values and consumption, international consumer attributes, international social and mental processes, will be used to help comprehend and explain the convergence and divergence of consumer behavior in the global marketplace. The goal of this course is to provide a more concrete understanding of how marketers account for similarities and differences in the development and implementation of marketing practices, in the field of advertising, product and service development and usage, retailing, and communications. PREREQ: MKTG 4510, SUMMER ONLINE

MKTG 4705 International Consumer Behavior | 4 Credit Hours»

Real Estate and the Built Environment

The fast-paced field of real estate and the built environment is one of the most competitive in the business world. Franklin L. Burns School of Real Estate and Construction Management at the Daniels College of Business offers three Graduate Business Certificates that arm you with the critical knowledge, technical tools and unparalleled industry access you will need to gain a competitive edge.

Each certificate program consists of 16 credit hours. You’ll take the same graduate-level concentration courses as MBA or master’s degree students at Daniels, but in a time frame that works best for you.

GBC-REBE Course Descriptions 2015-2016

Suggested Certificates—Or You May Customize Your Own

Real Estate Certificate

Meet the challenges and maximize the opportunities of today’s real estate climate by expanding your knowledge of capital markets, LEED sustainable development, global perspectives in real estate and more. This certificate provides experienced professionals with invaluable knowledge to succeed in both entrepreneurial and corporate environments.

Courses: 

REAL 4407 Income Property Finance

Conventional and alternative financing techniques, mortgage banking, law and markets, loan underwriting analysis, and the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on real estate and mortgage markets. Emphasis on case studies and computer applications.

REAL 4407 Income Property Finance»

REAL 4007 Real Estate Financial Analysis

Alternative analysis formats that can be applied to a wide array of real estate analysis issues; simulates working/decision-making environment; structured overview of analysis tools focused on specific facets of multidimensional real estate decision-making environment; applications in investment analysis, feasibility analysis, valuation, market analysis, and report writing and presentation. Prerequisites: REAL 4407

REAL 4007 Real Estate Financial Analysis»

Your choice of two of the following:

REAL 4477 Income Property Investments

Comprehensive analytical framework for real estate investment decision-making, equity investment decisions via discounted cash flow, and risk analysis models and strategic planning concepts, structuring parameters to maximize rates of return while controlling downside risks; emphasis on theory, concept building, growth, sustainability and environmental issues and practical application to various types of investment properties. Prerequisite: REAL 4007

REAL 4477 Income Property Investments»

REAL 4417 Income Property Valuation & Appraisal

Residential/Commercial appraising, including market cost and income approaches to value, gross rent multiplier analysis, neighborhood and site analysis; valuation of income properties including market cost and income approaches to value; capitalization theory and techniques, mortgage-equity analysis, and investment value concepts. Prereq. REAL 4407

REAL 4417 Income Property Valuation & Appraisal»

REAL 4467 Property Development & Feasibility Analysis

Commercial real estate development analysis & feasibility includes economic base analysis, tenant demand analysis, development and construction cost analysis, lease-up analysis, financial feasibility, leasing and property management practices. 5 major property types, office, industrial, retail, apartment and hotel are covered. Prereq. REAL 4007

REAL 4467 Property Development & Feasibility»

Property Development Certificate

Learn the latest in property and financial analysis, construction management and more from one of the top programs in the world. Designed for experienced professionals, this certificate provides a foundation of knowledge that can be built upon as technologies, market conditions and construction environments evolve and adapt.

Courses:

REAL 4407 Income Property Finance»

REAL 4467 Property Development & Feasibility»

REAL 4210 Planning, Entitlements & Public Finance

Real estate development, place making and community building require the combined efforts of the public, for-profit, and non-profit sectors. Participants in the real estate development process need to understand and appreciate the sometimes competing, and sometimes collaborative interests of governments, agencies, and the private developer. This course is designed to familiarize students with the overall context of urban planning and land use. Students will discover the variety of participants in the development process and will become familiar with the project entitlement process, zoning and land use regulation. Students will also examine public/private financing structures such as public-private-partnerships (P3s) and will become familiar with detailed calculations relating to Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) and Metropolitan Districts.

REAL 4210 Planning, Entitlements & Public Finance»

CMGT 4480 Construction Project Management

Principles and techniques of construction project management, use of systems analysis, internal and external procedures, planning, programming, budgeting and staffing, controlling major projects, emphasis on construction scheduling techniques with case application. Prerequisite: CMGT 4410

CMGT 4480 Construction Project Management»

Integrated Project Delivery Certificate

This certificate is for those with previous experience in construction management, architecture, engineering or other possible approved experience. This certificate provides in-depth information on project management, planning and cost controls.

Courses:

CMGT 4110 Pre-Construction Integration & Planning

This course examines the role of preconstruction services, team integration, and joint design planning in in various Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) approaches. Various tools and techniques associated with preconstruction services and design planning from the proposal stage through the design stages of a project is considered.

CMGT 4110 Pre-Construction Integration & Planning»

CMGT 4200 Lean Construction Project Management

This advanced course focuses on cutting edge lean tools and other productive strategies for the management of people and processes in the construction industry. The tools and strategies presented draw on the very successful Toyota Production System adapted to the construction industry. Lean construction methodologies such as the Last Planner® System, the Lean Project Delivery System™, and Integrated Project Delivery will be discussed. Topics also include sustainability and the emerging interest in “green construction,” as well as the use of Building Information Modeling to enhance the development and management of integrated projects. This course also looks at the human element in relation to motivation, safety, and environmental stresses. A number of case studies will be presented to highlight best practices in Lean Construction Project Management.

CMGT 4200 Lean Construction Project Management»

CMGT 4230 Design Management & Schedule Control

This course examines the various strategies and techniques associated with managing the design delivery process to align with the construction schedule needs in an integrated fashion. Design planning, scheduling, and resource allocation are considered along with design value determination and management of the various design-construct interfaces.

CMGT 4230 Design Management & Schedule Control»

CMGT 4310 Cost Modeling & Trend Management

This course covers various approaches to construction cost estimating at the conceptual stages of planning and design through detailed construction. Students will learn parametric estimating techniques and how they are applied to construct and predict reliable budgets at the earliest stages of design. Students will build cost models and refine those models with greater detail as design develops through a project. Building information modeling will be introduced and used to create massing models to demonstrate design impacts on project costs. Cost trending techniques will be presented to manage, monitor and document project performance relative to cost.

CMGT 4310 Cost Modeling & Trend Management»

Additional Real Estate and the Built Environment courses available to customize a certificate:

These may be combined with courses listed above.

REAL 4000 Business of the Built Environment

The emphasis of this course is on the importance of real estate and the built environment and its impacts and influences on how we live, work, and play. The course employs a full life cycle sustainable model that links the various phases, functions, and professions of real estate, project delivery, and asset/facility management to create holistic, value generating solutions for society. Professional practices/skillsets associated with the many career options that engage the built environment will be explored.

REAL 4000 Business of the Built Environment»

REAL 4210 Planning, Entitlements & Public Finance»

CMGT 4410 Construction Building Systems

A survey of residential and commercial construction materials, means, and methods associated with the various structural and architectural systems used to design and construct buildings. Project plans and specifications will be incorporated to teach the basic sequencing and overall construction process. The influence of sustainability in construction will be introduced.

CMGT 4410 Construction Building Systems»

CMGT 4480 Construction Project Management»

CMGT 4490 Residential Development

A course sequence designed to emphasize the practical application of the theories and concepts of residential development. The course provides a capstone experience for seniors. Students are expected to apply their knowledge of general business, real estate and construction management practices by forming a student business entity, acquiring land, building and selling a residential property in a case format. Students will apply accounting, finance, marketing, real estate and construction management techniques in the planning for a residential development. The application of green building materials and methods is emphasized. Prerequisite: CMGT 4410

CMGT 4490 Residential Development»

REAL 4010 Real Estate Capital Markets

This course exposes students to the commercial real estate capital markets; including real estate investment trusts (REITs) and commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS), plus institutional investors. The complexities of capital market products are discussed, students receive a greater understanding of the alternatives that are available. The class includes lectures, guest speakers, readings, class discussions, a major REIT analysis project, and case studies.

REAL 4010 Real Estate Capital Markets»

CMGT 4560 Relational Contracting

Relational contracting is a construction project delivery framework for multidisciplinary, integrated projects that focuses on aligned goals, high performance, innovation, mutual respect, open communication and a “no blame” culture between Client, Contractor, and Design Team. This approach to contracting, also known as Alliance Contracting, is becoming more prevalent in the United States and is often applied when using integrated project delivery systems. This course compares and contrasts transactional contracting methods with relational contracting methods and the influences on the project team and projects outcomes. Relational contracting will also be considered in the context of risk mitigation and project optimization.

CMGT 4560 Relational Contracting»

CMGT 4580 Integrated Teaming & Project Leadership

This course examines the unique leadership skills and talents associated with leading and facilitating multidisciplinary, integrated design and construction teams. The focus of the course is on applying strategic intelligence and a system of leadership in the development of integrated solutions for the built environment. This leadership model is driven by a compelling purpose and supported by people who share practical values and have excellent processes, to look into the future, create a vision, and bring that vision to reality. Effective strategies for supporting high performance teams will be explored.

CMGT 4580 Integrated Teaming & Project Leadership»

REAL 4110 Advanced Issues in Real Estate

This course concentrates on 10+ advanced real estate and construction management topics that vary each year including: green building; development issues such as planned communities; new zoning; water rights; negotiation skills; construction defects; design/build; current legal issues; plus new marketing techniques. Prerequisite: REAL 4407

REAL 4110 Advanced Issues in Real Estate»

REAL 4140 Global Perspectives in Real Estate

Focus on inbound and outbound U.S. real estate transactions and the cultural issues that impact these transactions. This can also be taken as a Burns Global Delegation travel course.

REAL 4140 Global Perspectives in Real Estate»

REAL 4337 Real Estate Securities/Syndications/Entrepreneurship

Introduces real estate securities with emphasis on private offerings, securities, registration requirements and exemptions, investor suitability, syndication, property acquisition, marketing the property, and tax and legal structure considerations.

REAL 4337 Real Estate Securities/Syndications/Entrepreneurship»

REAL 4347 Management of Income Properties

Explore the complexities of managing apartments, condominiums, office buildings, industrial property and shopping centers. This course covers rental markets, development of rental schedules, leasing techniques and negotiations, repairs and maintenance, tenant relations, merchandising, selection and training of personnel, accounting, and owner relations.

REAL 4347 Management of Income Properties»

REAL 4369 Real Estate Taxation

Tax factors affecting real estate investments; legal forms of ownership, depreciation, tax basis, tax impacts on exchanges, syndications, real estate securities, and other federal laws affecting real estate.

REAL 4369 Real Estate Taxation»

REAL 4400 Real Estate Principles & Practices

Principles of real estate, real estate industry and its markets; legal aspects of home ownership from consumer’s point of view, including property rights, title concepts, deeds, purchase contracts, listing contracts, law of agency, environmental issues and disclosures, types of mortgages, basics of home loan finance, appraisal investment and tax benefits. Partially satisfies Colorado real estate broker licensing requirements.

REAL 4400 Real Estate Principles & Practices»

CMGT 4320 Architectural Planning & Design Management

This course introduces students to the significant value that architecture brings to real estate and the built environment and the various services and professions associated with it. Students will be introduced to principles, protocols and the planning process related to the design function and the link between the architect’s vision and the finished physical structure. Students will be introduced to design thinking theory and application. Students will learn to read and interpret the various graphical and written construction documents, know how they are developed and what information they contain. Coverage of architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and civil drawings and specifications. The business model for design services will be explored as well as the unique risks and challenges associated with managing the design throughout the various stages of development and construction.

CMGT 4320 Architectural Planning & Design Management»

CMGT 4438 Legal Issues and Risk Management

General contract and real estate law, including property rights, title concepts, deeds, purchase contracts, law of agency, environmental issues and disclosures, basics finance concerns, tax law, landlord-tenant law, construction contracts, indemnity agreements, rights and remedies of property owners, contractors and subcontractors issues, and various areas of liability for real estate practitioners and property owners.

CMGT 4438 Legal Issues and Risk Management»

REAL 4500 Argus Financial Analysis

The central focus of this course is to expose the real estate student to a broad array of analysis and presentation tools, with practical applications of the Argus software through interactive examples and case studies. The course covers applications in Investment Analysis, Lease Analysis, Valuation, Feasibility Analysis Budgeting, Report Writing and Presentation. It is assumed that the student understands basic real estate principles and financial analysis. Prerequisite: REAL 4007

REAL 4500 Argus Financial Analysis»

REAL 4705 Risk Management & the Built Environment

Decision making and risk analysis concepts in the context of real estate and the built environment. This includes, but is not limited to, liability issues as to persons and property, casualty and property damage questions, employee and employer insurance areas, auto insurance, professional liability insurance, directors’ and owners’ liability issues, medical insurance, life insurance, environmental risks, and much more in areas of exposure that one can face in the business world. The course further examines means to minimize such areas of exposure.

REAL 4705 Risk Management & the Built Environment»

REAL 4800 NAIOP Challenge

Student teams analyze and formulate real-world solutions for an existing complex real estate problem, culminating in internal and external competitions. Includes a comprehensive written report and oral presentation. Prerequisite: instructor’s permission.

REAL 4800 NAIOP Challenge»

REAL 4980 Advanced Valuation & Report Writing

Learn techniques not yet institutionalized nor commonly practiced in the field. Includes writing skills appropriate to specialized nature of appraisal reports, and composition of a complex filed problem report to prepare student for writing “demonstration” report required for MAI professional designation. Prerequisite: REAL 4417 & REAL 4467

REAL 4980 Advanced Valuation & Report Writing»

CMGT 4120 Construction Planning & Scheduling

Understanding and applying scheduling and control to construction projects is essential to successful construction management. Project scheduling emphasizes network-based schedules, such as critical path management (CPM), network calculations, critical paths, resource scheduling, probabilistic scheduling and computer applications. Project control focuses on goals, flow of information, time and cost control, and change management. Prereq. CMGT 4410

CMGT 4120 Construction Planning & Scheduling»

CMGT 4155 Sustainable Development/LEED

The course includes many case studies of historic and contemporary structures exemplifying various sustainability features. Emphasis will be placed on how LEED project certification influences the overall construction project. Topics will include LEED certification techniques for sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy & atmosphere, materials & resources, indoor environmental quality, innovation and design. The following topics will be covered from a LEED perspective: ventilation, air conditioning, heating, electrical lighting, energy efficiency, and building control systems. The student will study and analyze how management and LEED techniques are applied to current construction projects.

CMGT 4155 Sustainable Development/LEED»

CMGT 4177 Environmental Systems & MEP Coordination

A study of mechanical and electrical systems (MEP) used in the construction of buildings. Course content will include system design, component selection and utilization for energy conservation, cost estimating of systems, coordination and management of installation. Specific systems included are electrical, air conditioning, heating, ventilation and plumbing, fire protection, life safety, communication, power systems and lighting. The course will also consider coordination of MEP systems and explore emerging technology and environmental issues related to mechanical and electrical systems in buildings.

CMGT 4177 Environmental Systems & MEP Coordination»

CMGT 4180 Construction Layout/Surveying

A study of mechanical and electrical systems (MEP) used in the construction of buildings. Course content will include system design, component selection and utilization for energy conservation, cost estimating of systems, coordination and management of installation. Specific systems included are electrical, air conditioning, heating, ventilation and plumbing, fire protection, life safety, communication, power systems and lighting. The course will also consider coordination of MEP systems and explore emerging technology and environmental issues related to mechanical and electrical systems in buildings.

CMGT 4180 Construction Layout/Surveying»

CMGT 4401 Residential Practicum

A course emphasizing practical application of the theories and concepts of residential development. Apply knowledge of general business, real estate and construction management practices by forming a student business entity, acquiring land, building and selling a residential property. Students apply accounting, finance, marketing, real estate and construction management techniques in the development of a single-family residence.

CMGT 4401 Residential Practicum»

CMGT 4420 Construction Estimating

This course is designed to provide the student with the theory, principles and techniques of quantity analysis (take-off), labor determinations, overhead and profit analysis. It offers insight into he construction estimating process. The role of the estimator, types of estimating, CSI divisions, bid/contract documents, change order pricing, design/build projects and estimation compilation will be introduced. Discussions regarding the cost/benefit of sustainable materials and typical construction materials will enhance the requisite knowledge of construction estimating. Prerequisite: CMGT 4410

CMGT 4420 Construction Estimating»

FMGT 4110 Corporate Real Estate & Facilities Management

This course provides a snapshot view of the corporate real estate life cycle and how to strategically plan and manage it. The course addresses key CRE issues including globalization, technology, sustainability and the enterprise business model. Within the framework of a corporate or agency structure, facility management is addressed as a distinct and critical component of successful performance. Topics include facility planning and forecasting, lease administration, space planning, allocation, and management, workplace planning, budgeting, and economic justification, real estate acquisition and disposal, sustainability management, construction project management, move, add, change (MAC) management, operations, maintenance and repair, technology management, emergency, security and life-safety management, and general administrative services.

FMGT 4110 Corporate Real Estate & Facilities Management»

Custom Certificates

Keep up with the fast pace of change in business with a customized business certificate from Daniels College of Business. By building your own certificate, you can focus on the specific skills and information you need to excel in your current position or advance to a new one.

You can select any four graduate-level courses that best match your career needs and educational objectives to build a customized business certificate. All courses are the same as those taken by MBA and master’s degree students at Daniels and are taught by our faculty members. Lisa Wuthrich, Program Developer for Graduate Business Certificates, can help you identify which courses to take and in which sequence.

Contact Lisa at Lisa.Wuthrich@du.edu or 303.871.2008 for more information.

Admissions Criteria

Students in the Graduate Business Certificates program at Daniels College of Business take the same rigorous courses as our MBA and master’s degree students. Our admissions criteria help ensure that prospective students have the academic record, work experience and motivation to contribute to and succeed in graduate-level courses.

  • Academic Record: We are seeking students with the proven ability to perform in an academic setting. A bachelor’s degree is required.
  • Work Experience: Work experience is preferred but not required. A professional resume is required with your application.

  • Essay: The one essay on the Graduate Business Certificates application is so that we can understand your goals and best advise you.

  • GMAT/GRE: The GMAT or GRE are NOT required for admission.

Graduate Business Certificates Tuition

The cost for the graduate business certificates is $1,258 per credit hour and $5,032 per class.

Tuition for Daniels College of Business graduate programs is based on a cost-per-credit hour set by the University of Denver. Tuition costs are the same for all students, whether they are residents or non-residents of Colorado.

Application Deadlines

Business certificate students can begin taking courses during any quarter.

Quarter

Start Date

Application Deadline

Spring Quarter, 2016March 21, 2016March 8, 2016
Summer Quarter, 2016June 13, 2016May 12, 2016
Fall Quarter, 2016September 12, 2016August 11, 2016
Winter Quarter, 2017January 3, 2017December 1, 2016

 

If you have any questions, please contact Lisa Wuthrich at lisa.wuthrich@du.edu

Details

Program CurriculumTake 16 credit hours to earn a GBC. You can also take fewer than 16 credits, although you will not earn a certificate. Classes are taken for academic credit.
Program DurationFlexible—it’s up to you. The courses that comprise a certificate can be completed in as little as six months or more than a year, depending on your schedule. Courses do not need to be taken in consecutive quarters.
Program Start DatesProgram begins every quarter: Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer. Each quarter is 10 weeks in duration.
PrerequisitesThe GBC program is open to everyone who has obtained at least a bachelor’s degree. Applicants must submit an application, a professional résumé and unofficial copies of transcripts.
GMAT/GREThe GMAT or GRE are not required for admission.
Class ScheduleClasses are held two evenings per week, typically following a Monday-Wednesday or Tuesday-Thursday schedule. Limited daytime option are also available.
Tuition$1,258 per credit hour. Each class is 4 credit hours.
Financial AidGovernment student loans are not available for this program. Private education-based loans are available. Make sure to mention that the GBC program is “part time and non-degree seeking.” Many companies also offer tuition-reimbursement programs.
AdmissionsApplications are evaluated in the order in which they are received. See more»