Daniels Faculty and Staff Community Involvement

Our faculty and staff are involved with community organizations that seek to promote, assist and celebrate the success of diverse communities. A few of these organizations include:

Alliance of Professional Women: The Alliance connects women personally and professionally through workshops, networking, and fundraising for microcredit financing of Village Banks in developing nations. Members work together with other community organizations to support women and girls and help them move toward the goal of becoming productive and self-sufficient citizens.

American Society of Women AccountantsThe American Society of Women Accountants (ASWA) was formed in 1938 to increase the opportunities for women in all fields of accounting and finance.

Asian Chamber of Commerce: Since 1984, the Asian Chamber of Commerce (ACC) has promoted awareness of and assisting in the economic development of the Asian business community.

Bridge ProjectThe Bridge Project strives to help children and youth living in Denver’s public-housing neighborhoods to achieve their academic potential and graduate from high school with the resources necessary to succeed as adults.

NAFSA: is an association of individuals worldwide advancing international education and exchange and global workforce development. NAFSA serves international educators and their institutions and organizations by establishing principles of good practice, providing training and professional development opportunities, networking opportunities, and advocating for international education.

National Black MBA AssociationThe National MBA Association remains committed to our mission of leading in the creation of educational opportunities and economic growth for African Americans.

National Society of Hispanic MBAsThe National Society of Hispanic MBAs (NSHMBA) was created in 1988 as a non-profit organization. Widely known as the “Premier Hispanic Organization,” NSHMBA serves 32 chapters and 8,000 members in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. It exists to foster Hispanic leadership through graduate management education and professional development. NSHMBA works to prepare Hispanics for leadership positions throughout the U.S., so that they can provide the cultural awareness and sensitivity vital in the management of the nation’s diverse workforce.

National Society of Minorities in Hospitality: NSMH is the premier professional organization for minority hospitality students. We address diversity and multiculturalism, as well as the career development of our student members.

Women in Cable TelevisionWICT develops women leaders who transform our industry. Developing women leaders is our mission. As the oldest and largest organization serving women professionals in cable telecommunications, Women in Cable Telecommunications (WICT) is at the forefront of an industry undergoing constant change. Since its founding in 1979, WICT has remained steadfast in its resolve to advance the position and influence of women through proven leadership programs and services at both the national and local level.

Women in Leadership: Women In Leadership is a bi-partisan organization dedicated to electing pro-choice women to public office. We seek and support candidates who believe that ensuring access to reproductive healthcare is essential to maintaining liberty for all women.  Our mission: Help elect those candidates at the local, state and national levels who share our commitment.

Women’s Vision Foundation: Women and men leading corporations that succeed because of their inclusive cultures.

World Future Society: The World Future Society is a nonprofit, nonpartisan scientific and educational association of people interested in how social and technological developments are shaping the future. The Society was founded in 1966 and is chartered as a nonprofit educational and scientific organization in Washington, D.C., U.S.A.

World Trade Center, Denver: In 1988 a group of 200 public and private representatives from Colorado’s international business community met to explore ways in which the Rocky Mountain region of the United States could more effectively benefit from the increasing globalization taking place throughout the world. Believing that change brings opportunity, this group began to form a vision of Denver and the region as a model global community, linked to the rest of the world by trade, investment, education, culture, transportation and communication.